Author Topic: History of the 75B SA  (Read 1027 times)

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Offline Beamy85

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History of the 75B SA
« on: December 05, 2018, 06:12:11 PM »
I just picked up a 75B SA back in October to go with my 75B, P-07, and P-09.

I've only had time to put about 50rds through it so far but I must say I'm very impressed with the groups it makes at 10yds using 124gr FMJs.

This has me wondering when CZ originally came out with the SA variant and what it's niche was/is. I wouldn't quite call it a duty pistol yet I wouldn't say it's a full on competition pistol either.
2009 CZ 452 Training Rifle .22LR
2010 CZ 75B 9mm
2012 Czechpoint VZ-58 7.62x39mm
2015 CZ 527 Carbine .223
2015 CZ P-09 9mm
2017 CZ P-07 9mm

Offline Earl Keese

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2018, 06:18:17 PM »
I just picked up a 75B SA back in October to go with my 75B, P-07, and P-09.

I've only had time to put about 50rds through it so far but I must say I'm very impressed with the groups it makes at 10yds using 124gr FMJs.

This has me wondering when CZ originally came out with the SA variant and what it's niche was/is. I wouldn't quite call it a duty pistol yet I wouldn't say it's a full on competition pistol either.
Last time I checked the CZ-USA website, it was listed with competition pistols.

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2018, 07:13:28 PM »
My youngest son has one.  He seldom takes his other pistols (save the P07 9MM) to the range anymore and even then only shoots a magazine or two through the P07.

When I ask him why he's not shooting anything besides the CZ75 SA he replies, "But dad, I just like shooting small groups."
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Metal Wonder Nine Guy

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2018, 09:35:13 PM »
I just picked up a 75B SA back in October to go with my 75B, P-07, and P-09.

I've only had time to put about 50rds through it so far but I must say I'm very impressed with the groups it makes at 10yds using 124gr FMJs.

This has me wondering when CZ originally came out with the SA variant and what it's niche was/is. I wouldn't quite call it a duty pistol yet I wouldn't say it's a full on competition pistol either.

To a degree, I would consider it to be a more modern version of the Browning Hi power.

Offline briang2ad

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2018, 04:26:30 PM »
I'm not sure of the allure of the 75 SA.  I only handled it once, and the trigger was not that good.  Can it be tuned to 1911 standards?  No camming? 

Quite frankly I've felt CGW P guns with no camming and crisp 1911 like triggers, and they still had DA if you needed it.

It looks cool though!   8)

Offline badwrench

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2018, 05:40:33 PM »
I just picked up a 75B SA back in October to go with my 75B, P-07, and P-09.

I've only had time to put about 50rds through it so far but I must say I'm very impressed with the groups it makes at 10yds using 124gr FMJs.

This has me wondering when CZ originally came out with the SA variant and what it's niche was/is. I wouldn't quite call it a duty pistol yet I wouldn't say it's a full on competition pistol either.

To a degree, I would consider it to be a more modern version of the Browning Hi power.

That's been my thought as well, a more modern version of the Hi power,  probably more affordable as well. I don't see why one could'nt carry one if they wanted.. maybe a few CGW parts, Dawson sights, and you'd be in business, perfect for the 1911 guys, who want to go to 9mm, want more mag capacity, and the same type of controls..

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2018, 05:47:58 PM »
My son bought a CGW race hammer and adjustable sear and a straight trigger from either CZ Custom or CZ USA (sometimes CGW and CZ Custom are out of stock on some parts and CZ USA will have the factory parts).

Between the hammer and some stoning/polishing of the trigger bar, the hammer strut, the reduced power trigger return spring and taking the firing pin block out of his pistol he's got a trigger pull of around 2&1/2 lbs.  Not as light as my Tactical Sport, but very crisp and a nice trigger for the range.
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Model Citizen

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2018, 08:36:00 PM »
OP was wondering when the SA variant first came out. Anybody know?

Offline JRR

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2018, 11:30:30 PM »
I'm not sure when they first came out.  My first one is dated 2001.  Did a manual trigger job and replaced the plastic trigger with metal.  Finally wore out the sear/hammer hooks in 2017 and replaced with CGW race hammer and adj. sear.  At the time, there were no molded holsters that fit the 40 cal B SA.  Had a custom kydex made that I'm still using to this day.  Trigger pull is a consistent 2.8 Lb. 

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2018, 06:51:56 AM »
JRR, that's a pretty pistol.
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Model Citizen

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2019, 07:08:38 PM »
I just found an interesting article in the Dope Bag column from the March 2001 American Rifleman. The title is CZ 75B SA Pistol.
It appears that the SA was a new variant then.
I’m not able to post a link to the article, perhaps someone will find it & post a link, it should be quite easy to find.
  Cheers, MC

Offline Tok36

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2019, 09:10:27 PM »
I just found an interesting article in the Dope Bag column from the March 2001 American Rifleman. The title is CZ 75B SA Pistol.
It appears that the SA was a new variant then.
I’m not able to post a link to the article, perhaps someone will find it & post a link, it should be quite easy to find.
  Cheers, MC

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/54178205/cz-75b-sa-pistol
Will work for CZ pics! (including but not limited to all CZ clones)

Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2019, 10:07:47 PM »
Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
To a degree, I would consider it to be a more modern version of the Browning Hi power.

I've heard this said before.  I don't see it.   (A lot folks claim the CZ is an update of the Browning Design, and that doesn't seem to be what you're saying.  I think you're talking about OTHER similarities.)
 
They are both very ergonomic handguns, but the CZ is a totally different design that just happens to look a little like a BHP.  About the only thing thing they have in common is a vaguely similar appearance and the fact that they both use the Browning Short Recoil Locked Breech design.  (The SRLB design is used by probably 95% of all semi-autos made since before WWII. ) 

What's really different about them?  Almost everything from the hammer spring design to how the trigger works.  The BHP doesn't have a trigger bar like the CZ; it has a sear lever which resides in the slide.  (That is a very awkward design feature.)   With the slide off, the trigger doesn't release the hammer. 

I traded away my older T-series BHP last year; it was a nice gun with a great trigger (thanks to a little gunsmithing), when I went to the range, it stayed in the gun safe.  It's gone now and I've still got three CZs,  one of which is a CZ-85Combat;   also have a semi-custom AT84s, and a Sphinx SDP.  I preferred all three of them to the BHP -- which is probably why it stayed in the gun safe when I went to the range.   And, of course, the CZ uses a magazine brake instead of a magazine safety.  (A pox on the BHP mag safety! Removing it is easy and it greatly improves the trigger.)

I also had a 75B SA for a a couple of years; mine was avery well-gunsmithed 75B SA originally owned by Eric Larsen (of www.hbeleatherworks.com), who had a local gunsmith somewhere out West do the work.  He did an excellent job on the gun.  (Even though the firing pin block wasn't removed, you could barely tell it was still there.)  It was a great gun with a good trigger and very accurate.   But I wanted something different.)


Offline Metal Wonder Nine Guy

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 03:47:59 PM »
I'm not sure of the allure of the 75 SA.  I only handled it once, and the trigger was not that good.

Yeah, the stock 75 SA that I handled still had takeup in the trigger just like a standard DA to SA trigger. I really expected the trigger to have a crisp wall and break like a Hi power or 1911 since it is single action only.

Offline Metal Wonder Nine Guy

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2019, 03:52:03 PM »
Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
To a degree, I would consider it to be a more modern version of the Browning Hi power.

I've heard this said before.  I don't see it.   (A lot folks claim the CZ is an update of the Browning Design, and that doesn't seem to be what you're saying.  I think you're talking about OTHER similarities.)
 
They are both very ergonomic handguns, but the CZ is a totally different design that just happens to look a little like a BHP.  About the only thing thing they have in common is a vaguely similar appearance and the fact that they both use the Browning Short Recoil Locked Breech design.  (The SRLB design is used by probably 95% of all semi-autos made since before WWII. ) 

What's really different about them?  Almost everything from the hammer spring design to how the trigger works.  The BHP doesn't have a trigger bar like the CZ; it has a sear lever which resides in the slide.  (That is a very awkward design feature.)   With the slide off, the trigger doesn't release the hammer. 
You are right- both guns have some similarities in appearance, and that's something I've often heard from many reviews on how the two guns look similar. But they are very different in design. The article below does a better job at summarizing the differences and similarities between the two.

http://hipowers-handguns.blogspot.com/2008/06/browning-hi-power-cz-75-are-they.html