Author Topic: History of the 75B SA  (Read 2249 times)

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Offline badwrench

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2019, 05:01:21 PM »
That's pretty much it.. there are some similaritys, between the two.. Control placement is similular, But the big difference, to me anyway, was the fact that the SA was generally more easily available, and usually at a much lower cost.  Almost everyone I know who has/had a Hi-Power, usually had some work done to them, and depending on what was done, it can get expensive, while the SA might need some work as well, I'm thinking it could be done for less, and you'd end up with a pretty nice pistol..

Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2019, 08:25:38 PM »
Quote
The article below does a better job at summarizing the differences and similarities between the two.

http://hipowers-handguns.blogspot.com/2008/06/browning-hi-power-cz-75-are-they.html

The article has the general information right, but Browning's original design was a single-stack, 9-round, striker-fired gun.  Saive was the one who created a good, working double-stack magazine, and continued work on the design for 9 years after JMB died.  Two years after Browning died, the Colt 1911 patents expired, and Saive was able to incorporate some of those design features into the BHP... so it was really a true joint venture with Browning's 1911 features added to what Saive had worked on with JMB.

The BHP is probably as much a Saive design as a JMB design -- but being able to use 1911 design features made it a better design, too.  Then, too, gun makers in Europe thought so highly of Browning, they really liked having his name attached to any weapons JMB  designed for them. 

Saive was an FN gun designer and employee who worked as Browning's assistant during the years  Browning was under contract to FN.  Saive eventually became the head weapons designer for FN-Herstal.  He made some major design changes to Browning machine guns that greatly increased their rate of fire and effectiveness, and designed some MGs of his own.  All of the "improved" Browning MG designs were  major players in WWII, in aircraft, as well as with some some of the ground forces.  Many of those designs are still in use in militaries around the world.




Offline eastman

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2019, 10:15:58 PM »
Quote
The article below does a better job at summarizing the differences and similarities between the two.

http://hipowers-handguns.blogspot.com/2008/06/browning-hi-power-cz-75-are-they.html

The article has the general information right, but Browning's original design was a single-stack, 9-round, striker-fired gun.  Saive was the one who created a good, working double-stack magazine, and continued work on the design for 9 years after JMB died.  Two years after Browning died, the Colt 1911 patents expired, and Saive was able to incorporate some of those design features into the BHP... so it was really a true joint venture with Browning's 1911 features added to what Saive had worked on with JMB.

The BHP is probably as much a Saive design as a JMB design -- but being able to use 1911 design features made it a better design, too.  Then, too, gun makers in Europe thought so highly of Browning, they really liked having his name attached to any weapons JMB  designed for them. 

Saive was an FN gun designer and employee who worked as Browning's assistant during the years  Browning was under contract to FN.  Saive eventually became the head weapons designer for FN-Herstal.  He made some major design changes to Browning machine guns that greatly increased their rate of fire and effectiveness, and designed some MGs of his own.  All of the "improved" Browning MG designs were  major players in WWII, in aircraft, as well as with some some of the ground forces.  Many of those designs are still in use in militaries around the world.

Saive was also the designer of the FN-FAL.
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Offline canthelpit

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2019, 01:04:10 PM »
I just found an interesting article in the Dope Bag column from the March 2001 American Rifleman. The title is CZ 75B SA Pistol.
It appears that the SA was a new variant then.
I’m not able to post a link to the article, perhaps someone will find it & post a link, it should be quite easy to find.
  Cheers, MC


Sounds about right.  The CZ catalog I have from 2000 (I think) doesn't have the SA listed.

Online ejb1975

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2019, 03:33:48 PM »
The allure of a SA 75b in .40 to me was the full slide rail (9mm is a faux full slide rail) and the full beavertail/guide rod. I believe a 75 Shadow is the only way you can get those features in a 9mm.  I just acquired an SP-01 barrel and fit it to my 40 so she is multi cal now. I have several other upgrades coming to improve the trigger.




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Offline adrian

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2019, 03:48:39 PM »
     Hiya and thx for the thread. I was introduced to the 75bSA when I found a mint CZC make over at a used gun shop and it worked perfect, After previously using several other frames for my Kadet kit ,this one really took first prize for me. Tho I didn't want to have to keep switching out 17lb for 13lb mainsprings,I got on the list for a base model 75bSA and tuned that up to dedicate its frame for the .22, To me its the perfect match. Be well.

Offline DenStinett

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2019, 06:16:53 PM »
     Hiya and thx for the thread. I was introduced to the 75bSA when I found a mint CZC make over at a used gun shop and it worked perfect, After previously using several other frames for my Kadet kit ,this one really took first prize for me. Tho I didn't want to have to keep switching out 17lb for 13lb mainsprings,I got on the list for a base model 75bSA and tuned that up to dedicate its frame for the .22, To me its the perfect match. Be well.

Gotta agree there
The B-SA is a great Pistol as is
Perfect as a bridge from the 1911 into the DA/SA realm
BUT, it is the GREATEST platform for the KADET

So tell me again how Trump will be worse then the last 8 years !

Online Sulpgnir

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2019, 08:54:12 PM »
I just found an interesting article in the Dope Bag column from the March 2001 American Rifleman. The title is CZ 75B SA Pistol.
It appears that the SA was a new variant then.
I’m not able to post a link to the article, perhaps someone will find it & post a link, it should be quite easy to find.
  Cheers, MC

A little late, but here it is:




Offline adrian

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2019, 09:55:04 PM »
     Hiya and thanks for your thread and our operator providing the article. I chimed in earlier and praised the platform. Prolly hijacking the thread,so sorry. But looking at it in concert with the progression of the many cz's I had no idea I'd ever become an owner of. I see a kind of evolution of the 75bDA/SA to 75b-SA, and then the 75b Shadow, 75b Shadow ll,etc. When the shadow frames started getting paired with the tactical sports uppers to become the long slide,avail in DA/SA and SAO. The variety of the whole line lets us keep finding new favorites. Be well.

Online Sulpgnir

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2019, 04:39:51 PM »
....I see a kind of evolution of the 75bDA/SA to 75b-SA, and then the 75b Shadow, 75b Shadow ll,etc. When the shadow frames started getting paired with the tactical sports uppers to become the long slide,avail in DA/SA and SAO. The variety of the whole line lets us keep finding new favorites. Be well.

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Online Maynard

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2019, 07:54:37 PM »
It's a nicely appointed pistol out of the box with the extended safeties, extended mag release and the nicer beavertail than the stubby but With a couple hundred dollars in parts, it's a stellar pistol.



Offline Redcoat3340

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2019, 07:24:38 PM »
"With a couple hundred dollars in parts, it's a stellar pistol."

I just acquired one but haven't had it to the range yet.  (Next two days or so.)

Trigger breaks between 3.5 and 4 pounds and there's no camming...but it isn't a clean break.  After the easy, no stress takeup it his a "stop" but then there is just a bit of creep, not much but it's noticeable, then Bang.

I don't know if it will affect how well I can shoot it.  (This is my 3rd 75, and one Tanfoglio.  I had a pre-B, Omega trigger, and I forget the model of the Tanfoglio but they were all sold or trades, I just couldn't seem to shoot them as well as some of my other pistols -- Walther P5, Colt 1911 in 9, my BHPs, and Sigs.  I'm giving it one last try with this one).

So I'm wondering, what parts would you recommend.  I'm not looking for a competition gun, or something to carry, just a real nice(er) range gun.

The Hogue grips will go and something nice and thin will replace them (G10s) and it's got night sights but maybe a FO front; but what else to improve the trigger, that is, smooth it out a bit.  Just some stoning?  Or are there parts I should be thinking about.

Looking forward to this gun....I really want this one to work.

thanks in advance.

Online Maynard

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2019, 08:17:03 AM »
"With a couple hundred dollars in parts, it's a stellar pistol."

So I'm wondering, what parts would you recommend.  I'm not looking for a competition gun, or something to carry, just a real nice(er) range gun.


Something like this:

https://cajungunworks.com/product/75439-defensive-carry-package-for-manual-safety-cz/

I would also recommend calling CGW and talking to them about your expectations and go from there.

Black out the rear sights with a Sharpie or paint pen, paint the front sight white or red or you can spring for the Dawson Precision fiber sights.

https://cajungunworks.com/product/ezd-9-40-for-9mm-and-40-sw/

Offline Sunkist

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2019, 09:59:33 AM »
I found this pistol and CZ when I did a search for a .40 cal 1911 I could afford. Now, 6 CZ's later I still love this platform and am hooked on CZ's in general. When the Brushed Stainless 9mm appeared with that sexy beavertail I converted one to SAO. It shoots as good as it looks. I will find a photo hosting site and post some pics soon.
"In the Land of the Blind the One-Eyed Man is King."

Offline Sunkist

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Re: History of the 75B SA
« Reply #29 on: April 01, 2019, 10:30:22 AM »
[/img] Well, this link works but I don't know how to make the image appear here.
"In the Land of the Blind the One-Eyed Man is King."

 

anything