Author Topic: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75  (Read 2178 times)

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Offline briang2ad

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2019, 05:48:44 PM »
It is easiest to train and with a striker fired (SF) gun.  Problem is that MANY try to get THAT pull as short and light as a target 1911.  I used to think either this or C/L was the way to go to have consistent shooting, but I also was a tad uncomfortable carrying a tuned striker gun.  I also KNOW from time in the Army with a 1911, that one could EASILY forget to engage the safety to start an engagement.  Bad.

Then when I started to carry, I went to a Kahr because of the long BUT smooth and moderate pull.  Then, when I wanted to carry a double stack again, I decided to go DA/SA.  DA/SA is NOT optimum as Walt points out.  The training to get a good 1/2 shot down is tough.  I am still not where I want to be, but I will drive on.  I am completely comfortable carrying with first shot in DA.  I can take a head shot and hit it at 10 yards all day long in DA.  Its harder but doable.  To me it is worth it. 

Many safeties are just too loosey goosey for me.  The HiPower and the 75B are just too easy.  The PreB is good in thie regard as is the Canik, but back to the 1911 - I'd rather not have a safety.  To the OP - especially with a CZ B model, decocking the hammer is safe and allows you to use the safety IF needed.  The reason I presently DON'T own a CZ decocker (with the 75 system), is for this reason and the fact that it is SO much easier to work on the internals of the safety model. 

The 75 system OTB is just NOT that good in execution.  QC and the system produce a pretty gritty pull on most CZ guns compared to a SIG, Beretta, or even an HK. That is why I ditched the P01 years ago and never bought a SP01 in decocker - even though they are very good guns. 

The Omega allowed me to polish and Cajunize to get that smooth light trigger - that you need in DA/SA to become proficient. So I turned to the P series, and llfe was good.   

So.. with the 75, I am a fan of decocking manually for the first DA shot.  Not pinching!  Block with the thumb, release the trigger, and roll the thumb out of the way. 
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 05:56:45 PM by briang2ad »

Offline cntrydawwwg

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2019, 07:02:03 PM »


but I see few shooters with the discipline to release trigger and let the fpb engage WHILE they are lowering the hammer.
    Very true. Everything we’ve been saying does depend upon the shooter safely handling the pistol in the way it was designed.
     
    I’m not saying you’re wrong in how you feel (all mine are decocker also and I carry at 1/2 cock). It’s just that when describing what’s safe, how to operate etc., I’m just giving plain safe firearm handling advice, that’s in the manual.

   Removing your finger from the trigger is not discipline, it’s safety 101 IMHO. The whole point is what is safe from design IE hammer fully down. From design, yes it’s safe. If a person is an unsafe shooter, then it may not be.  If someone makes the choice to manually decock, then they need to practice that correctly. Once again, I see this as safety, not discipline.
   
    But this whole discussion of course is strictly people’s opinions. Having differences of opinions is what helps us learn and keep this forum going.

     
   
   
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Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2019, 07:39:10 PM »
Quote from: CzechnoWizard
...techniques but for carry I always revert to the mode of a da 1st shot and no safety,  either a decocker cz or a striker.
I understand your reasoning, and would suggest that it takes less practice to master pushing  a safety down during the presentation than it does to master the DA/SA transition.  But we'll leave that topic unresolved, for others to debate ad nasuum. :)

I would note, however, that very few striker-fired guns are truly double-action, even though the gunmakers call them that.
  • CZ made one a few years back -- the CZ-100 -- and it was DAO.  I had two of them (9mm and .40), and they were NOT my favorite guns.

  • The only other true DA striker-fired guns I know of were the Walther P99 or similar S&W99 -- and maybe the Walter PPX.  The Walther P99AS and the S&W99 came in models that would let the shooter decock the striker if that seemed appropriate and then fully charge the striker and release it with a single trigger stroke.  But, as is the case with many striker-fired guns, you could partially pre-tension the striker by chambering a round and deal with it like you would a Glock.  Others that may also be in that same design class are the Canik TP9, Magnum Research MR9, and the  some versions of the Taurus 24/7 -- and there may be others.   

  • I have a Springfield XDm which is SA, but it has a grip safety.  I would rather it have a frame-mounted safety, but it's a great gun. It does not have a decocker. I think most of the Springfield polymer guns use the same basic design.   Springfield says they're all DA models.

  • Most folks familiar with the design say that the S&W M&P design leaves the striker assembly virtually 98% fully tensioned; only trivial additional trigger movement is needed to release the striker.  (I've got a great S&W M&P Pro...)

  • I also have a Ruger SR9c which is striker-fired, but it also has a frame-mounted safety.  I have a FNS9c, an FNS-40, and an FNS-40L and none of them have frame-mounted safeties -- they're a bit like Glocks -- but the same models  are available with frame-mounted safety.

  • I used to have a couple of Lugers (P-08) and they were striker-fired and true single action semi-auos. The striker was fully charged and a frame-mounted safety was typically engaged when the gun was holstered.

  • Most of the other striker-fired guns, and this includes Glocks, are a sort of spring-assisted SA, because slide movement partially tensions the striker spring to about 65% of the distance it must travel, before leaving it in a "safe" state until the trigger trigger can be used to finish charging the striker spring and releasing it. BUT, If the primer in the chambered round doesn't ignite, pulling the trigger again (i.e., a second-strike capability) doesn't do anything; you must moving the slide some distance before the trigger will work.
Most striker-fired semi-autos bypass the DA/SA transition issue, but that doesn't mean that the guns being used are SAFER than safety-equipped DA/SA or SA designs.  There have been far too many Glock negligent discharges in the LEO community to really make anyone believe that striker-fired guns are fundamentally safer than guns with frame-mounted safeties.

A 1911 with a five pound trigger is not greatly different than many of the Glock 21s out there -- but people would scream to high heaven if anyone here advocated carrying that 1911 with the safety off and round chambered, which is a routine practice for the Glock and doesn't have a user-managed safety.   Do you really feel SAFER with a striker-fired gun?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 09:57:49 PM by Walt Sherrill »

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2019, 07:47:45 PM »
Quote
I understand your reasoning, and would suggest that it takes less practice to master pushing  a safety down during the presentation than it does to master the DA/SA transition.  But we'll leave that topic unresolved, for others to debate ad nasuum. :)

Good point Walt.  That is also why I like a ‘switchable’ gun - especially with a CZ.

"There have been far too many Glock negligent discharges in the LEO community to really make anyone believe that striker-fired guns are fundamentally safer than guns with frame-mounted safeties."

Hence my move to Kahrs and then DA/SA. 
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 03:29:22 PM by briang2ad »

Offline Metal Wonder Nine Guy

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2019, 11:37:13 PM »
It is easiest to train and with a striker fired (SF) gun.  Problem is that MANY try to get THAT pull as short and light as a target 1911.  I used to think either this or C/L was the way to go to have consistent shooting, but I also was a tad uncomfortable carrying a tuned striker gun.  I also KNOW from time in the Army with a 1911, that one could EASILY forget to engage the safety to start an engagement.  Bad.

Then when I started to carry, I went to a Kahr because of the long BUT smooth and moderate pull.  Then, when I wanted to carry a double stack again, I decided to go DA/SA.  DA/SA is NOT optimum as Walt points out.  The training to get a good 1/2 shot down is tough.  I am still not where I want to be, but I will drive on.  I am completely comfortable carrying with first shot in DA.  I can take a head shot and hit it at 10 yards all day long in DA.  Its harder but doable.  To me it is worth it. 

Many safeties are just too loosey goosey for me.  The HiPower and the 75B are just too easy.  The PreB is good in thie regard as is the Canik, but back to the 1911 - I'd rather not have a safety.  To the OP - especially with a CZ B model, decocking the hammer is safe and allows you to use the safety IF needed.  The reason I presently DON'T own a CZ decocker (with the 75 system), is for this reason and the fact that it is SO much easier to work on the internals of the safety model. 

So.. with the 75, I am a fan of decocking manually for the first DA shot.  Not pinching!  Block with the thumb, release the trigger, and roll the thumb out of the way.
Well, yeah. A striker fired pistol has one consistence pull, not the vastly different DA and SA transitions. At a couple ranges, three of those employees I’ve talked to there are CZ fans. Two of them cut their teeth on 1911s and liked the fact that CZs could be ‘cocked and locked’. The third guy doesn’t care for cocked and locked carry and has told me that he has trained himself to cock the hammer back on his CZ while drawing it. Apparently he didn't trust the safety. A Youtube video reviewer mentioned in his 75B video that he wished the 75's safety was more positive.

I am not a great double action pistol shot, but for some reason, I still prefer having a longer and tangible pull in a stressful situation. If I had a shorter trigger pull, that might be detrimental if I get jumpy and send a round downrange where a bullet shouldn’t go.

https://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/why-switched-double-action/

Quote
I understand your reasoning, and would suggest that it takes less practice to master pushing  a safety down during the presentation than it does to master the DA/SA transition.  But we'll leave that topic unresolved, for others to debate ad nasuum. :)

Good point Walt.  That is also why I like a ‘switchable’ gun - especially with a CZ.

"There have been far too many Glock negligent discharges in the LEO community to really make anyone believe that striker-fired guns are fundamentally safer than guns with frame-mounted safeties."

Hence my move to Kahrs and then DA/SA.
And that’s why I decided to focus on double action hammer fired pistols when I went to buy my first pistol last year.

I do appreciate all of the responses, folks. Thanks for all of the replies.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 11:42:48 PM by Metal Wonder Nine Guy »

Offline larryflew

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2019, 12:30:51 AM »
Cocking while drawing put a lot of holes in legs back in the old west where single action was the only option.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 06:38:20 PM by larryflew »
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Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #36 on: January 08, 2019, 08:53:10 AM »
Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
Well, yeah. A striker fired pistol has one consistence pull, not the vastly different DA and SA transitions.

Not vastly different than DA and SA transitions?


Well... I've owned a bunch of both (and still have examples of both in my gun safe), and I've never found the trigger pull on a DA/SA gun that WAS NOT VASTLY DIFFERENT from a typical striker fired gun (one that pre-tensions the striker spring for each shot).  I don't think most of the folks participating here will support you in that position.  And darned few DA/SA shooters are able to get consistently small 1-3 fired groups on a target.  The few who do pull it off are generally "master class" shooters who spend many more hours practicing and shooting than the typical shooter.  They're about the only ones I've seen do that in competition.  For others it's likely to be even more rare. I call BS on that assertion.

I like striker-fired guns, and most of mine have clean-breaking but moderatly heavy trigger pulls (4-5 lbs.) and I'm quite comfortable with that sort of trigger.   Heavy triggers aren't bad if there no grundge in the take up and the trigger breaks cleanly.

When I carry a DA/SA gun, its one of 4 that I own that can be carried cocked & locked.   Right now, the only DA/SA gun I own that doesn't have the C&L capability is a Sphinx SDP, which is just a sweet gun -- and I use it at the range.  Had I been able to get one with a safety, I would have done so -- but they weren't being imported to the U.S. at the time.  I got a great deal on that gun, and don't regret buying it, but I've never carried it.   

Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
At a couple ranges, three of those employees I’ve talked to there are CZ fans. Two of them cut their teeth on 1911s and liked the fact that CZs could be ‘cocked and locked’. The third guy doesn’t care for cocked and locked carry and has told me that he has trained himself to cock the hammer back on his CZ while drawing it. Apparently he didn't trust the safety. A Youtube video reviewer mentioned in his 75B video that he wished the 75's safety was more positive.

The guy who has trained himself to cock the hammer on his CZ will likely,  in a very intense  stressful real-life confrontation, or in one of the gun games (IDPA or USPSA when "match jitters" might hit him, put one in his leg, or in the ground.  It's one thing to be  proficient at the range, and quite another to stay that way when there's more at stake -- like your ranking in a match or your LIFE.  Stress is a great stimulant but also a great disrupter.

Offline Metal Wonder Nine Guy

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2019, 10:18:07 AM »
Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
Well, yeah. A striker fired pistol has one consistence pull, not the vastly different DA and SA transitions.

Not vastly different than DA and SA transitions?


Well... I've owned a bunch of both (and still have examples of both in my gun safe), and I've never found the trigger pull on a DA/SA gun that WAS NOT VASTLY DIFFERENT from a typical striker fired gun (one that pre-tensions the striker spring for each shot).  I don't think most of the folks participating here will support you in that position.  And darned few DA/SA shooters are able to get consistently small 1-3 fired groups on a target.  The few who do pull it off are generally "master class" shooters who spend many more hours practicing and shooting than the typical shooter.  They're about the only ones I've seen do that in competition.  For others it's likely to be even more rare. I call BS on that assertion.

I like striker-fired guns, and most of mine have clean-breaking but moderatly heavy trigger pulls (4-5 lbs.) and I'm quite comfortable with that sort of trigger.   Heavy triggers aren't bad if there no grundge in the take up and the trigger breaks cleanly.

When I carry a DA/SA gun, its one of 4 that I own that can be carried cocked & locked.   Right now, the only DA/SA gun I own that doesn't have the C&L capability is a Sphinx SDP, which is just a sweet gun -- and I use it at the range.  Had I been able to get one with a safety, I would have done so -- but they weren't being imported to the U.S. at the time.  I got a great deal on that gun, and don't regret buying it, but I've never carried it.   

Quote from: Metal Wonder Nine Guy
At a couple ranges, three of those employees I’ve talked to there are CZ fans. Two of them cut their teeth on 1911s and liked the fact that CZs could be ‘cocked and locked’. The third guy doesn’t care for cocked and locked carry and has told me that he has trained himself to cock the hammer back on his CZ while drawing it. Apparently he didn't trust the safety. A Youtube video reviewer mentioned in his 75B video that he wished the 75's safety was more positive.

The guy who has trained himself to cock the hammer on his CZ will likely,  in a very intense  stressful real-life confrontation, or in one of the gun games (IDPA or USPSA when "match jitters" might hit him, put one in his leg, or in the ground.  It's one thing to be  proficient at the range, and quite another to stay that way when there's more at stake -- like your ranking in a match or your LIFE.  Stress is a great stimulant but also a great disrupter.

4-5 lb striker fired triggers kind of remind me of an SA pull in a double action autoloader-not as light as a SAO and usually with a little bit of takeup, but still very manageable and straightforward to learn on.

Please keep in mind that I'm not trying to start a debate or cause a fuss. I was just making a point that there is some difference with a heavier DA pull and the lighter SA pulls as opposed to a striker's 1 consistent pull.

« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 04:03:35 PM by Metal Wonder Nine Guy »

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #38 on: January 09, 2019, 09:30:25 AM »
Quote
The guy who has trained himself to cock the hammer on his CZ will likely,  in a very intense  stressful real-life confrontation, or in one of the gun games (IDPA or USPSA when "match jitters" might hit him, put one in his leg, or in the ground.  It's one thing to be  proficient at the range, and quite another to stay that way when there's more at stake -- like your ranking in a match or your LIFE.  Stress is a great stimulant but also a great disrupter.

I respect this view.  However, I have watched a video of a veteran competition shooter decock a Shadow he was reviewing that was set up with a manual safety.  So... I assume that this kind of gun is used in competition as DA/SA and it is done so by more than a few people, and is 'legal' for competition.  I think if this was proven as unsafe, it would be disallowed in competition circuits. I also take a different view than most people on decocking.  I use the off hand for various reasons.  To me it is a 'slow down and use two hands' sort of thing because it is part of reholstering.  Thus, I have no trouble with a P99 which almost requires you to use the off hand. 

Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #39 on: January 09, 2019, 10:26:21 AM »
Quote from: Walt Sherrill
The guy who has trained himself to cock the hammer on his CZ will likely,  in a very intense  stressful real-life confrontation, or in one of the gun games (IDPA or USPSA when "match jitters" might hit him, put one in his leg, or in the ground.  It's one thing to be  proficient at the range, and quite another to stay that way when there's more at stake -- like your ranking in a match or your LIFE.  Stress is a great stimulant but also a great disrupter.

Quote from: briang2ad
I respect this view.  However, I have watched a video of a veteran competition shooter decock a Shadow he was reviewing that was set up with a manual safety.  So... I assume that this kind of gun is used in competition as DA/SA and it is done so by more than a few people, and is 'legal' for competition.  I think if this was proven as unsafe, it would be disallowed in competition circuits.

I wasn't addressing the dangers of decocking in the example you responded to, but to the dangers possible when someone COCKS the weapon during the draw.

As for decocking (implicitly) with one hand: if we modify your statement above to address decocking, the important part of your statement was that if had been PROVEN UNSAFE it would have been disallowed.  In that case, I think you're right -- it hasn't been proven UNSAFE. 

I've seen it done many times in competition and also at the range, and I typically decock using the off hand to steady the gun and my strong hand to manage the trigger and hammer.  But I can easily do it using ONLY the strong hand if necessary.   

In a match decocking with one hand isn't disallowed.  But, if there is an accidental discharge the shooter will generally be immediately disqualified.  Most shooters in a match will be extra careful in such a situation, as they don't want to be disqualified.  :)  More importantly, in a match bystanders are NOT standing nearby, a Safety Officer is present, and the gun is always pointed downrange (generally at an angle so that a round would hit the ground.)  There's really no reason to deal with the cause of the problem (inept decocking) as the result is what's dealt with -- by ending the competitor's activities for the day.

Concern about decocking is much overblown! Not that many guns really require decocking.  With MOST GUNS, you can use a safety if you want to holster the weapon -- or use a decocker.  With most striker-fired guns, you just holster the weapon with your finger far away from the trigger.  If you're leaving the range or a match, you just unload and clear the weapon.  As much as people worry about decocking accidents, I don't think I've ever seen it happen or heard of it happening, either at a range, at home, or during a match.  It's almost like an urban myth. 

That said, I've seen all sorts of issues when people draw (present) from the holster -- along with other things that scare the crap out of me...  (Ever pay much attention to the ceiling at an indoor range?  Or the walls?)

Offline newageroman

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #40 on: January 09, 2019, 03:04:52 PM »
I generally don't like decockers. My 75B limited gun is converted to SAO so I start cocked and locked. My HD gun is an SP-01 safety model that I keep fully decocked/hammer down in a safe. My carry gun is a Kahr DAO with that nice long smooth trigger (I looked at many sub compact single stack guns before settling on the Kahr and the smooth consistent trigger is the primary reason I went with it).

When manually decocking the 01, I don't have any issues and getting practice with the decocking process is nice to have. Another factor in the safety model was if I move it into a competition gun in the future, safety option is easier to work on. I would think that even if moving to production comp with a DA/SA gun, I would still be just as comfortable with (and prefer) manually decocking rather than using a decocker. I guess I will always be that way until I end up with a hole in the floor or the dirt (I usually go outside and point it to the ground when decocking).

Just my .02.
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Offline Radom

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #41 on: January 12, 2019, 01:58:20 PM »
All of this just blows my mind. 

Competition, rules, and all that aside:  if you handle a pistol with an external hammer, you should be able to decock that pistol with one hand.  (Trigger finger on the trigger; and thumb from the same hand on the hammer.) 

I'm not that old, and this was considered a BASIC skill for handling a handgun as recently as 20 years ago.  It's just another learned skill/behavior.  If you practice this, it is more natural/normal than using a decocking lever. 

What does a decocking lever do for you?  It puts an external hammer down on a loaded chamber with no external safety.  It does nothing for you that you cannot do for yourself. 

   
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Offline CzechnoWizard

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #42 on: January 12, 2019, 02:26:57 PM »
I so want to keep my mouth shut but.....
I agree - competition rules etc can be left out of the discussion, but in real life....
Decocking a cz or 1911 1-handed is foolish and dangerous. If you lose control of the hammer while holding the trigger back you will likely have an unintended discharge.
If you have a pistol equipped with a safety, and only 1 hand available to manipulate it, then put the safety on and holster up cocked and locked. Attempt a 1 handed decock and I'm throwing you off my range.
What the decocker does is give you a means to lower the hammer without touching the trigger. The hammer does not "fall on a loaded chamber with no safety", it drops to and is stopped on the decock position. If there was a mechanical failure in this process, the firing pin block is there to prevent a discharge. Since your booger hook is off the bang switch, the FPB is not disengaged and is thus available to save your bacon.   Competition aside, decocker pistols are intended to be holstered and carried with hammer down ready for a da 1st shot. SA pistols are made to be carried cocked and locked, and std CZ 75B is made to carry either way. BUT a non decocker 75b should either be put on safe or 2-hand decocked before holstering. If you are decocking every time you holster, you should have purchased a D model with decocker.  If that offends you, don't get pissed off at my bluntness - I just gave you an excuse to buy another CZ!

Offline Radom

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #43 on: January 12, 2019, 02:53:18 PM »
I so want to keep my mouth shut but.....
I agree - competition rules etc can be left out of the discussion, but in real life....
Decocking a cz or 1911 1-handed is foolish and dangerous. If you lose control of the hammer while holding the trigger back you will likely have an unintended discharge.
If you have a pistol equipped with a safety, and only 1 hand available to manipulate it, then put the safety on and holster up cocked and locked. Attempt a 1 handed decock and I'm throwing you off my range.
What the decocker does is give you a means to lower the hammer without touching the trigger. The hammer does not "fall on a loaded chamber with no safety", it drops to and is stopped on the decock position. If there was a mechanical failure in this process, the firing pin block is there to prevent a discharge. Since your booger hook is off the bang switch, the FPB is not disengaged and is thus available to save your bacon.   Competition aside, decocker pistols are intended to be holstered and carried with hammer down ready for a da 1st shot. SA pistols are made to be carried cocked and locked, and std CZ 75B is made to carry either way. BUT a non decocker 75b should either be put on safe or 2-hand decocked before holstering. If you are decocking every time you holster, you should have purchased a D model with decocker.  If that offends you, don't get pissed off at my bluntness - I just gave you an excuse to buy another CZ!

Than you for the selective misquoting. 

I said no EXTERNAL safety.  CZs aren't Berettas or Walthers.  You generally have two options: decocker (no external safety) or external safety. 

With the FPB, you can easily decock a Type B with one hand.  You pull the trigger while easing the hammer down.  If you release the trigger, the FPB is engaged, and the pistol cannot fire.  Once the hammer is lowered past the half-cock notch, the hammer cannot generate enough energy to overcome the inertia of the firing pin spring system, even if the trigger remains pulled.  It's pretty elementary. 


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Offline CzechnoWizard

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Re: Manual Decocking question for manual safety CZ 75
« Reply #44 on: January 12, 2019, 03:24:41 PM »


[/quote]With the FPB, you can easily decock a Type B with one hand.  You pull the trigger while easing the hammer down.  If you release the trigger, the FPB is engaged, and the pistol cannot fire.  Once the hammer is lowered past the half-cock notch, the hammer cannot generate enough energy to overcome the inertia of the firing pin spring system, even if the trigger remains pulled.  It's pretty elementary.
[/quote]


Yep. It's easy right up until something goes a little wrong. Maybe your hands are a little sweaty or the hammer has a little oil on it.  You must have amazing reflexes to be able to release that trigger after your thumb slips off the hammer and before it strikes the pin. You are far too wise and experienced to ever share a range with an nervous nancy like me. Thank you for sharing your hard earned wisdom with all the young folks here so they can emulate your manly pistol handling skills and have the opportunity to experience an AD or maybe even a self inflicted GSW.  It must be awesome to be so cool that you can single hand decock and not rely on a crutch like a proper decocker.   Actually, as brave as you are, I'm not sure why you ever decock.  If I had your courage and wisdom, I would just start to carry Mexican style, appendix position, hammer full cocked.  With your confidence and discipline that should be no worry... Us sissies and our little sisters can keep our decockers to ourselves or we can engage a safety before holstering but we will never be able to measure up to a real man who 1 hand decocks without any qualms.

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