Author Topic: Gun Storage Climate  (Read 1354 times)

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Offline Trh9905

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Gun Storage Climate
« on: January 31, 2019, 02:41:18 PM »


I?m building a gun storage area next to my workroom in my basement.  In the spring, summer and fall I can maintain 70 degrees and with a humidity level at 40% but this time of year the humidity hangs near 16%.  I didn?t worry about low humidity in my gun safe in the winter so I don?t know why should I worry about it now.

Do you worry about humidity in your gun storage area?

What have you done for climate control in your gun storage area?









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Offline motorcyclist

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2019, 05:18:27 PM »
Haven't worried about it as I've never had to. While the humidity can get bad here in the summer, it's usually not for more than the afternoon and then it comes down in a thunderstorm. The heat pump-a/c unit does a good job of taking the moisture out of the house too. My safe sits in a walk in closet with a floor register next to it. I guess it gets a steady stream of dry air. I have a Finnish M39 that's pretty much "in the white" that's been in that safe for 15 years without a spec of rust on it.
Never had a hydrometer so I can't tell you what levels of moisture is in my house. If 40% is your highest I don't think your going to have any problems. 

Offline larryflew

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2019, 06:51:31 PM »
I would worry if it was a high humidity problem but not low. You should be good to go.
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Offline ZanderMan

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2019, 07:21:10 PM »
Just don?t let a static electricity spark ignite your powder keg.
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Offline lewmed

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2019, 11:50:50 PM »
 I think you will be okay unless you plan on reloading in your new room.  I had to install a humidifier low humidity plays hell with my Dillon powder measures in the winter months I also keep a golden rod and 25 watt light in my gun safe.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 01:40:48 PM by lewmed, Reason: made change »

Offline armoredman

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2019, 05:10:45 AM »
I'm in the desert - what's "humidity"? Is that related to "snow"?  ;D
Seriously I cannot imagine what low humidity could have an effect on other than drying out wood.

Offline Trh9905

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2019, 05:29:16 AM »
That?s it, I am concerned about the wood.  I guess I should consider investing in a humidifier.


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Offline Tyerone

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2019, 12:37:56 AM »
Ha.  Dry now in Michigan, but I just recharged the 2 desicant bags I keep in the safe.  1 hr at 240F (I think).   I have a color code on  the cardboard containers that turns pink when getting moist.

Maybe 4 or 5 times a year in my Southern Mi climate.  Less if your HVAC is controlling your safe's location.

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2019, 07:18:36 AM »
I've had guns (rifles/shot guns) stored in the attic at mom and dad's house for over twenty years.  In those old zippered gun cases everyone used for their hunting guns 30 years ago.  I got them out twice in those twenty years (maybe closer to 25 years) to inspect, wipe down with an oily cloth.  No rust.  They are pretty as the day my father-in-law died and left them to me.  His grandson's have all of them now (why I got them down a few years ago.)  That was in the mountains where it gets darn cold in the winter (-22F the other morning mom said) and up to the mid 80's outside in the summer (so the attic is probably around 100F or so and humid on those warm summer days (mid 80's up there is miserable to them).

Down here in the flatlands of central VA I also kept my old Springfields, M1917's, shotguns, .22's, etc. in the attic for almost 30 years.  Some of those guns have never been shot while I've lived here and I only got them down to inspect and wipe off every 8 or 9 years.  Same type of storage, zipped up in those old cases.  Around here it can be 115F or more in the attic and humid enough that it feels hard to breath when you get up there.  Winter time it can get below freezing.

You've got to wipe them down with an oily cloth, you can't touch the metal after you wipe them down, you don't want the roof to leak on them.  If they've got a good coat of oil on them the humidity doesn't get to the metal's surface, in my experience anyway.  Mine look the same as they did when I bought (some of them) over 40 years ago.

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Offline Tyerone

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2019, 01:50:15 PM »
If worried about dry wood, research Conrad's Wood Youth Oil.  Once or twice a season on gun stocks, a pint will last for years.  Now, if you decide to rejuvinate your larger fine wood furniture, get a gallon!  I had the pleasure of working a couple jobs with John Conrad back in Middle School  early high school.  The oil was the main treatment for a Millionaire's restoration job.  Sprinkler/fire prevention system went off inadvertantly.  The home restoration folks moved the fine wood, now soaked furniture to an unheated pole barn.  Naturally it warped in sub zero temps.

Just be warry that there may be consequences of restoring the wood.  My 1950s vintage Win 94 was all dried out.  As the wood returned to factory, the swelling put more pressure on the barrel bands and I began stringing shots.  Loosened up the barrel band screws a bit and its all good again!

Offline Dasashooter

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2019, 09:09:43 PM »
I never really worry about low humidity, high is normally an issue living in the south. Just maintain any wooden stocks etc with decent oil or something. I do temp and humidity control where my guns are kept by both air conditioning and dehumidifier.

Offline ejb1975

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2019, 03:54:54 PM »
Renaissance Wax works great on preserving wood/metal etc.


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Offline Wobbly

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2019, 09:16:11 AM »
? The Number 1 rule is to make sure all gutters are clear, and all downspouts route rain water away from the building's foundation.

? For best results you typically don't want the humidity getting above 55%. If your basement (or other gun area) humidity level can spike during downpours, then adding a heater stick inside your gun safe is all you need. Warming tends to ward away minor humidity.

? If your basement regularly stays higher than 65% humidity, then that part of your house was probably not originally built as a "living space", and could therefore benefit from introducing some of the home's furnace air. Moist air is typically stationary air, and it simply needs some circulation. In those cases you can buy a 3" hole saw and introduce new openings in the duct work. 1 or 2 holes in the supply lines is enough to circulate air, and change the temp by 2? and lower the humidity 10-15%.

? Homes in the Southeastern US have a particular issue with humidity build up in basements and crawl spaces. Most homes in this area are equipped with small, metal foundation "vents". In theory you open the vents in summer and close them in winter, but there is always more rain than wind, and this design is an absolute failure. The only cure is to seal up all basement doors and vents, then lay thick plastic sheeting atop all exposed dirt, and install a dehumidifier that is permanently plumbed to empty outside.

Also be aware that modern furnace/AC units create condensate all year round. This also needs to be removed from the home.


Hope this helps.
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Offline Trh9905

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Re: Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2019, 09:29:41 AM »
Thank you.


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Offline Trh9905

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Gun Storage Climate
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2019, 03:13:38 PM »
It?s called Conrad?s Wood Food Oil now.   Thank you so much Wobbly.


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