Author Topic: Weak design points of the CZ-75  (Read 1225 times)

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Offline briang2ad

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2019, 12:12:15 PM »
I do think the hammer/trigger "camming" issue is about mindset.  The Czechs were squarely part of the Eastern Bloc then , and despite their Western history were clearly not part of a 'consumer mindset'.  Producing a gun that kept its military export customers from Negligent discharges was more important than other aspects, so producing a hammer/sear that cammed before break was preferred.  I don't think anyone East of Germany was worried about lawyers back then.

While I normally polish hammer struts I've not found it to be of noticeable benefit. 

Offline Walt Sherrill

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2019, 03:21:24 PM »
Quote from: briang2ad
I do think the hammer/trigger "camming" issue is about mindset.  The Czechs were squarely part of the Eastern Bloc then , and despite their Western history were clearly not part of a 'consumer mindset'.  Producing a gun that kept its military export customers from Negligent discharges was more important than other aspects, so producing a hammer/sear that cammed before break was preferred.  I don't think anyone East of Germany was worried about lawyers back then.

While I normally polish hammer struts I've not found it to be of noticeable benefit.

I don't think the CZ-75 was ever intended to be a military weapon. I think the CZ-75 was designed with the Western civilian market in mind (or if NOT the Western civilian market,  non-NATO states elsewhere in the world.)  Maybe something in the reference  or CZ history books will show that I've misunderstood what really happened.

Why?  No other weapons in the Warsaw Pact arsenal used the 9x19 round. (One exception I know of was the captured Lugers used by the East German  Police, but that was a special case.  I had one of those!!)

I think it d it would have been a cold day in hell before any Western/NATO military bought military weapons from a Warsaw Pact member country during the Cold War.   (And let us not forget that there was a Western TRADE EMBARGO against the communist bloc that had started in 1949 and lasted for about 50 years!  Canada was one of the few Western countries where you could get a CZ-75!)

Had military use been a goal, CZ could've created a number of variants in other calibers that might have been used in the Warsaw Pact.  A CZ-75 in 7.62x25 -- which would require a bit bigger grip -- might've been interesting.  I'd take one of those over a CZ-52 or Tok-33 any day!)

The "camming" wasn't really all that noticeable in the pre-Bs or early 75B models, and it doesn't go away by itself or after break-in. The "camming" in new guns seemed to get worse in recent years, but it seems to come  and go.  I don't  know, but suspect that that CAMMING isn't an issue for the larger IPSC/USPSA guns from CZ; I heat little but praise about those actions.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 09:44:13 AM by Walt Sherrill »

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2019, 07:55:03 PM »
Walt:  I still think it was an Eastern Bloc mindset and it was deemed 'safer', and simpler to make.  My 84 PreB cams plenty.  Maybe the early Prebs did not as much - never held a first model.

Offline Tok36

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2019, 09:03:11 PM »
Another gunsmith even recommended polishing the inside walls of the hammer spring (but didn't explain how to do THAT -- maybe a  long round chainsaw file?)

SP01SHADOW
(Past forum member) covered this in one of his posts a while back ill see if i can track it down. I have not attempted it my self, polishing the hammer strut has been sufficient with my CZ projects thus far.

Edit:
Reply #97 of this thread.

CZ 75 BD COMPACT BUILD

https://czfirearms.us/index.php?topic=89226.90
« Last Edit: September 12, 2019, 09:18:07 PM by Tok36 »
Will work for CZ pics! (including but not limited to all CZ clones)

Offline Earl Keese

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2019, 09:26:36 PM »
"Another gunsmith even recommended polishing the inside walls of the hammer spring (but didn't explain how to do THAT -- maybe a  long round chainsaw file?)"

I just tightly roll a piece of sandpaper. Oil it up, feed it through and start shoe shining. Not sure if it's worth the effort, but it doesn't take very long so I do it if I'm being thorough.

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2019, 08:46:05 PM »

Offline Indy_Tim

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2019, 05:56:53 AM »
"Another gunsmith even recommended polishing the inside walls of the hammer spring (but didn't explain how to do THAT -- maybe a  long round chainsaw file?)"

I just tightly roll a piece of sandpaper. Oil it up, feed it through and start shoe shining. Not sure if it's worth the effort, but it doesn't take very long so I do it if I'm being thorough.

Another method might be to pull a bit of paracord through the spring and then put some polishing compound on it while working it back and forth.  I’m not sure how much of a difference that could make but I may give it a shot on one of my 75s.

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2019, 12:35:00 PM »
I've polished plenty of hammer springs/struts in CZs ans SIGs.  It NEVER makes an appreciable difference. 

Offline chenjeffus

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Re: Weak design points of the CZ-75
« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2019, 08:46:18 PM »
I have heard lots of about weak trigger return spring on CZ.  Not until last week, I had one break on my Shadow 2.  $7 for the spring and $13 for the pin, took about 20 mins to replace..

 

anything