Author Topic: Decocker weight  (Read 426 times)

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Offline Greub

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Decocker weight
« on: April 29, 2020, 06:00:44 PM »
So is the amount of force needed to actuate the decocking lever a function of the sear spring and decocking spring? Or is it also influenced by the hammer spring?

Offline Tok36

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2020, 07:54:35 PM »
The Hammer Spring may contribute due to the friction of the hammer hooks contacting the Sear. The decocking action seams to smooth out over time with use. Adding a drop of lube to a few spots can help. Polishing specific parts can also smooth things out.

In factory stock configuration, if you look close while you slowly actuate the decocking lever you can watch the hammer cam back a bit before it falls to half cock. So the factory hammer camming also contributes. 
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Offline boomenshutzen

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2020, 08:24:54 PM »
In my experience it does smooth out over time. Early on, I found if I was going to be shooting more than a few hundred rounds some athletic tape on my thumb helped.

Ultimately, I followed Ernest Langdon's example and now decock with my weak hand (left) thumb most of the time.  That way I'm able to get more leverage and it doesn't cause any soreness the day after.

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Offline Greub

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2020, 09:32:49 PM »
So would running a lighter hammer spring change the decocker feel much? Or just make it a touch less snappy? My p01 is fairly new (less than 300 rounds), so it may continue to smooth out/ change

Offline Tok36

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2020, 06:16:45 PM »
Having not tested this specifically i can not say for sure. Decreasing the hammer spring weight may change it a bit. Keep in mind that if you go lower than a 15# Hammer Spring you may encounter light strikes with some ammo without the addition of an Extended Firing Pin.

I am interested to hear other forum members input on the subject.
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Offline PeteB

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2020, 09:42:32 PM »
One can press the hammer back to take the effect of the hammer spring, and the friction between the seer and hammer out of the equation.  Then work the decocker with only the decocker spring tension.  That would tell you if the hammer spring contributes much to the resistance.

I noticed that decocker springs cost $2 online at Cajun Gun works, so you could buy a couple and experiment with relaxing them a bit.

https://cajungunworks.com/product/62-decocker-lever-spring/

I would guess that the notch on the hammer that holds it in the cocked position will smooth out with wear, because as the gun is decocked, you basically have two metal edges sliding past each other. (I did not buy mine new, so I don't know how it was then)

Incidentally, an older CZ handgun was notorious for the decocker failing with wear and causing accidental discharge.  It is possible that for that reason, more recent models got a much stronger mechanism to prevent that from happening.  In other words, although one can probably lighten the decocker spring, it might not be safe to do so...

Offline Greub

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2020, 12:12:58 PM »
The decocker almost feels mushy when holding the hammer back. I’m Thinking that the hammer spring definitely applies a lot of the snappy feeling when you are releasing the hammer and letting it fall to half cock. Not looking to lighten it (or make it unsafe), just trying to understand what all is at play during the decocking motion. To me it appears that the positive click at the bottom of the decocking motion is pulling the sear up. This puts all of the hammer spring tension on the decocking arm, which then pulls the decocking lever up and the hammer to half cock

Offline PeteB

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2020, 02:47:36 PM »
...To me it appears that the positive click at the bottom of the decocking motion is pulling the sear up. This puts all of the hammer spring tension on the decocking arm, which then pulls the decocking lever up and the hammer to half cock

I think you are correct.  I tried it again and as I release the hammer with the decocker all the way down, a fair amount of added spring pressure is pulling the lever up

Offline Greub

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2020, 06:12:17 PM »
To me it seems like using the decocker wouldn’t negatively impact wear on any parts (sear or hammer) more than a normal sa pull. Since you are essentially lifting the sear over/up the hammer hooks, but catching it in half cock instead of dropping it to the firing pin. Totally just guessing here.

Offline Tok36

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2020, 06:38:09 PM »
   Good point about manually holding the hammer back while actuating the decocking lever to test the friction. I just tested one of mine and it seams that the factory hammer hook height and factory hammer camming really play into how much force is required to actuate the lever. An after market hammer is likely to have a significant effect alone.
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Offline Greub

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Re: Decocker weight
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2020, 09:02:57 PM »
Wasn’t planning on changing hammers on my p01 but Tok36 is tempting me! Lol I bet the hook height and hammer spring weight will significantly change how the decocking motion feels