Author Topic: My Seal One "Gel" became a runny Liquid---even now while kept inside for months.  (Read 188 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Laufer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
  • Retired from air transport business.
I'm quite familiar with numerous online discussions of Seal and its much-debated predecessor. Only Seal is used on all of my eight handguns,
and being retired there is plenty of time for reading about guns-along with Krav Maga and jogging outside.

 The bottle was in my car a couple of weeks last summer, but since being in an air conditioned room since then,
 it was expected to return to its "Gel State". Well.....

The only real question for me is whether the Protective properties might be Decreased when it is in the present runny, liquid form? ???
I'm not like most users, having bought it for the P and L functions, preservative, but also lube.

 To clarify a bit -- has any likely degradation of the compound taken place which offers much less protection against corrosion?
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 04:00:35 AM by Laufer »

Offline eastman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2816
I don't use this product, so my response is based on 24+ years as a professional mad scientist and not as a Seal One user.

If subjecting the bottle to extended high temperature caused it to change from a gel to a runny liquid, you probably had a phase separation. Whatever ingredients were used to promote gel formation are probably a solid layer on the bottom of the bottle. You will most likely need to stir them back into suspension. Is the bottle clear so you can see the contents? The thickeners may only be a few percent of the total volume.
I don't look like my avatar!

Offline Laufer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
  • Retired from air transport business.
eastman: Thanks.
Am pretty sure that the bottle has been shaken at least once or twice  since it was brought into the house.

The bottle is transparent, and the orange liquid appears identical to its original appearance.
Will call the factory out of curiosity.

Luckily the surfaces of the guns still have the very thin but very slick feel to them (i.e. on the near-pristine Sig P6 which is seldom used). There is nothing on Google which discusses any breakdowns in protection (or anything else) resulting from the liquid being runnier.

Offline eastman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2816
shaking without some sort of agitator might not be enough to get a layer of thickener off of the bottom. If it is a plastic bottle, you could try adding a few glass beads or stainless steel ball bearings.
I don't look like my avatar!

 

anything