Author Topic: .22lr Training Does Help  (Read 1455 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline hartzpad

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 217
.22lr Training Does Help
« on: May 09, 2006, 06:59:28 AM »
Relatively new to pistol shooting (about 2 years and less than 3500 rounds) and I've never tried competing nor focused practicing. Decided to get some practice done yesterday, so I grabbed my CZ SP-01 and my Kadet .22lr conversion and had at it. A Shooting USA episode a few weeks ago had a training tip to set up two steel targets about 8 feet apart and place one shot on each target going from one to the other as fast as you can. I also did some double tap drills going from target to target (I know, double tap drills with .22lr is not great practice ). I then practiced drawing and taking a quick DA first shot on target. I also tried shooting and moving and then engaging the steel targets from different points. I started at about 10 yards and ended up about 15 yards away and could hit even the smaller target 90% of the time while transitioning.

I went through 400 rounds of .22lr with only 2 - 10 round mags, ouch! But I noticed a big difference in how fast I was able to transition between the two targets (one was a full size IPSC torso and the other a 40% IPSC torso roughly 6"x8", much smaller). I then switched to 9mm and 10mm for some more pratice and it was like shooting a cannon after .22lr. I was definitely faster with 9mm after that practice than before.

Despite what the naysayers may say about .22lr practice, I know that it works for me and it only cost me about $6.50 and two sore thumbs. Also, it further smoothed out the CZ's trigger which is a great side benefit. I just received my used PACT Club Timer III today so I plan to use that to help me progress in my pratice. Now if only CZ would make some 19 round .22lr mags for their Kadet kit so I could have real world pratice like my SP-01 and less reloading. I need more .22lr mags.

Walt-Sherrill

  • Guest
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2006, 04:36:02 PM »
You're using your Kadet Kit the way I think it's ideally used -- to practice presentations/first shots, etc.  

Much more than that, however, and its of questionable value.

But plinking is just fun...

Offline lukipsc

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 105
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 02:42:52 PM »
For first shot, one shot - run/change position/reload/ect. it is maybe really good but I think you are veteran shooter, because for start shooter it is not good, when he switche for 9 mm he will scare from boom...

Walt-Sherrill

  • Guest
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 02:51:15 PM »
My point, originally, was that with multiple shots, the recoil is so different, that you may develop some bad habits if you continue with the .22 in a "game" type scenario.  

The transition from target to target is different.  

If you have no concern, go for it.  

I'll practice with 9mm, anyway, 'cause after about 100 rounds, I question the value of any "learning/training" you'll be getting.  

MORE isn't always better.  Short period of very intense practice is good.  But as you start to get tired, you also start to practice things less well...

Offline elsolo75

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 383
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2006, 07:13:17 PM »
That Janapese fellow that practices with airsoft only 11 months a years then comes over here and cleans up at the Steel Challenge;he makes me think it is much more about presentations, visual feedback, calling one's shots, etc. and recoil control is only a small part.

Walt-Sherrill

  • Guest
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2006, 04:54:31 AM »
Perhaps.  Perhaps, too, that Japanese guy (who I have also read about and seen on one gun magazine) is one of those VERY GIFTED ATHLETES (phenomenal reflexes, good visual abilities, astute analytical skills, etc.) who would have done well, regardless.  

I think that if using .22 ammo for practice was really almost as good, most of the pros who spends thousands of dollars each year in practice (and unknown hours reloading) would have switched over long ago.

Matthew?  Angus?  What's your take on this topic?

Offline Tangram 37

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2006, 10:19:04 PM »
Training with a .22 vs ____ can be some of one and some of the other.  Stating the obvious admittedly.... Recently I have been focusing on snapping my eyes from one target to the next.  The .22 seems to work fine for this kind of practice. The hole in the down zero confirms my sight picture and alignment, and shot calling are on the mark.

On the other hand shooting a bill drill with a .22 might not be effective and my eyes/brain would not get the recoil input needed to improve my shooting with my match/carry pistol.

I can fire six rounds of .22 for one round 9 mm.  That pushes me to see what I can do with .22. I look at shooting the .22 is as a form of dry fire that leaves a paper trail.  

However, except for a few circumstances if I had unlimted amount of 9 mm, .45, or 38 Special I'd shoot that most of the time.

All the above is predicated on using a .22 that is nearly the same (trigger sights and frame) as my 9 mm.  With the Kadet kit that is possible.

Offline elsolo75

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 383
.22lr Training Does Help
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2006, 10:57:40 PM »
I think that what the pros do for practice and what us mere mortals need to do may very well be different.

Practice your weaknesses.
I bet I have much different weaknesses than Angus, Matt, Robbie, etc.

Right now I know I need to work on my target-to-target transitions, and mostly my shot calling. I think a .22 will work just fine for those.

If I were practicing for American Hangunner, I think I would need to shoot plate racks with my regular gun and regular loads, the timing and gun cycling would be just way too different.

Then again there is much practice you can do without firing a single shot: dryfire, reloading, drawing, stepping into/out of shooting positions, sight aquisition through ports, physical conditioning, etc.