Author Topic: P-10 C slide auto forwarding  (Read 537 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline fastlane604

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 229
P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« on: June 09, 2018, 10:08:11 PM »
Has anyone figured out a consistent way to make your P-10 C slide auto forward on a slide lock reload? On 75Bs and Shadows you reprofile the slide stop.  Can you do anything with the P-10 C?

Offline m1a_scoutguy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 185
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2018, 11:21:34 PM »
I don't have a P-10 but I have not seen a Semi that wouldn't auto forward. I have found that if you hit the rear/bottom of the grip area with your palm on inserting the mag most slides will release. If you hit the mag base flat or in the front of the grip it will not work consistently. And although I have done my share of auto-forwarding slides on many semis I fully believe it is a traning SCAR and should not be counted on. If it works it works but am a firm believer in using the slide release or over the top and slingshot method.  ;) If your only concerned about this for range fun and compatition then maybe its OK but for a EDC/Self-defence senerio then use the release or slingshot method. And even in competition if it doesn't work the 1st time and ya have to hit it again your losing seconds.

Offline Cjusmc28

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2018, 02:03:39 AM »
I've have my P10C a couple of month now and have probably run 400-500 rounds though it. The first few times were hit or miss with the auto forwarding but as the pistol begins to break in it seems to be more consistent. Sending the magazine home with a good solid grip seems to get the job done every time.

Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk


Online Indy_Tim

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 534
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2018, 05:15:18 PM »
I little polish to the bottom of the breech face and to the slide stop rear face helps a lot.  Don't remove any metal, but just make what's there a bit more shiny.  That's what I did with mine when new and it has been consistent ever since.

Offline Bossgobbler

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 727
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2018, 07:54:57 PM »
Polish the slide and slide release

Offline ac215

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2018, 08:00:14 PM »
I have about 200~300 rounds in the p10c. I've found that as long as I have strong grip and insert the mag with some authority, it will auto forward.

Offline Walt Sherrill

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2018, 10:13:51 PM »
Quote from: m1a_scoutguy
If your only concerned about this for range fun and compatition then maybe its OK but for a EDC/Self-defence senerio then use the release or slingshot method. And even in competition if it doesn't work the 1st time and ya have to hit it again your losing seconds.

If it doesn't work the first time, you can just press the slide release.  But if you choose NOT to do that and choose to hit the butt of the gun again, the elapsed time to the next shot will still likely be quicker than when using slingshot method.  Why?  Because the slingshot method forces you to move the gun much farther away from the target (or the attacker) while you grab and release the slide, and then move it back on target before you can take a shot.  That takes more time than you think.   Using the slide release, slamming the butt of the gun, or using the hand-over technique allows you to keep the gun in front of your face and your eyes on the target.

The handover method (hand over the rear of the slide) is considered a good method, and can work quite well -- but doesn't always work with guns like the Beretta 92/M-9.  In that case the hand-over method can decock the gun, which might not slow you down, but will change the expected trigger pull weight.

We might be quibbling over a very fine point, as the vast majority of handguns used in self-defense situations seldom involve enough rounds to require a reload...

Offline 1SOW

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14970
  • GO GREEN - Recycle 9MM
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2018, 01:26:24 AM »
Surprisingly,  most 75s don't even need the magazine.  With a good grip strong hand,  hit the bottom of the grip with the heel of your weakhand and that will release the slide. O0

Offline fastlane604

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 229
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2018, 09:25:56 AM »
Earl,

I agree that if we were specifically talking about a self-defense engagement we are quibbling.  I shoot IDPA and that was the purpose of my post.

Offline m1a_scoutguy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 185
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2018, 02:32:38 AM »
Quote from: m1a_scoutguy
If your only concerned about this for range fun and compatition then maybe its OK but for a EDC/Self-defence senerio then use the release or slingshot method. And even in competition if it doesn't work the 1st time and ya have to hit it again your losing seconds.

If it doesn't work the first time, you can just press the slide release.  But if you choose NOT to do that and choose to hit the butt of the gun again, the elapsed time to the next shot will still likely be quicker than when using slingshot method.  Why?  Because the slingshot method forces you to move the gun much farther away from the target (or the attacker) while you grab and release the slide, and then move it back on target before you can take a shot.  That takes more time than you think.   Using the slide release, slamming the butt of the gun, or using the hand-over technique allows you to keep the gun in front of your face and your eyes on the target.

The handover method (hand over the rear of the slide) is considered a good method, and can work quite well -- but doesn't always work with guns like the Beretta 92/M-9.  In that case the hand-over method can decock the gun, which might not slow you down, but will change the expected trigger pull weight.

We might be quibbling over a very fine point, as the vast majority of handguns used in self-defense situations seldom involve enough rounds to require a reload...
Earl,

I agree that if we were specifically talking about a self-defense engagement we are quibbling.  I shoot IDPA and that was the purpose of my post.

Yea I saw the other post after posting in this one,LOL my luck ! Also when I said Slingshot I really meant the hand over technique . I shoot/train more towards the defensive aspect of shooting so I have been taught and learned the tap/rack (handover the slide) method so even though your grabbing the slide NOT pinching it your still kinda sling shoting it as in grabbing it and letting it go and not following the slide home. Anyways even for competition the auto forward is still a gamble I feel, yea many guns do it a lot and consistently but with that said and I quess it would be worth looking up but anyone that feeds there family with the shooting sports doesn't count on the auto forward method. Like I say worth some research I guess  ;) Couple people come to mind: Doug Koenig,Julie Golob,Jerry Miculek,Lena Miculek & the list can go on. Here is a good vid,this guy has won a match or two in his day,check it out. In the end you have to decide what is best for you and if your just shooting a match here and there and it works for you then great go with it. Whether my gun auto forwards or not I rely on the slide release for the best most consistant reloads and the over hand slingshot method on my guns that have small or hard to hit slide release's. Most important thing is your out there shooting and training/competing, stay safe and have fun !

Offline changemyoil66

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 36
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2018, 04:05:32 AM »
Polishing the slide release so its more sensative.

Im not a fan. My other pistol (vp9) sometimes does it and i always power stroke, so i end up ejecting 1 round.

 I never use slide releases (personal preference). My m&p 9c has a slide stop, not a slide release. So u have to power stroke all the time. For this reason is why i got into the habbit of power stroking.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk


Offline Walt Sherrill

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2018, 11:01:24 PM »
Re: the video...

I find his use of the handover technique pretty effective and agree (with him), that the slide release (particularly as he suggests, using the weak hand thumb) to be simpler and faster.

The term "slingshoting" has always, in my experience, been a  term used by instructors to show how to pull back a slide as you operate a slingshot: you grab the loaded pouch/rear of the slide with thumb and fingers, pull it back , and then release it.  Until you used the term differently (as did the instructor in the video), I had never seen the term "slingshot" and "hand-over" used interchangeably.  I've seen instructors address both methods in classes, and they considered them different techniques.

Hand-over, done properly lets you leave the gun up in front of the face, with the gun kept on or generally pointed toward the target.  If you use the slingshot method as it was originally taught (and as the military taught it until after we sent troops to Afghanistan and Iraq) - you must pinch the rear of the slide and pull it back (just as you pull back the loaded pouch of a slingshot and then release it).   Using THAT technique, you can't easily grasp the slide (in the "slingshot" manner) until you've moved the gun even more out of position.
  • The old argument that slingshoting was a gross motor skill and using the slide stop/release was a fine motor skill has been pretty much debunked:  they're arguably both fine motor skills -- as releasing a slide held in the "slingshot grasp" must also be done cleanly.
  • The handover technique might truly be a gross-motor technique, but it does take longer, and that technique  doesn't always work with the Beretta M9, because large hands can decock the weapon during the rearward stroke.  The handover technique seems to work well with most other guns.
I've always used the off hand after inserting the mag,  to move up to release the slide with several fingers to making a big "claw" that can't miss the slide stop/release, then moving back down to the support position.  That said, I think I like the instructor's technique  of using the offhand thumb as he reposition it to the grip, to release the slide.   I think I'll that technique a try for a while -- as it's a bit simpler than what I've been doing for years.

Offline m1a_scoutguy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 185
Re: P-10 C slide auto forwarding
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2018, 01:39:41 AM »
Re: the video...

I find his use of the handover technique pretty effective and agree (with him), that the slide release (particularly as he suggests, using the weak hand thumb) to be simpler and faster.

The term "slingshoting" has always, in my experience, been a  term used by instructors to show how to pull back a slide as you operate a slingshot: you grab the loaded pouch/rear of the slide with thumb and fingers, pull it back , and then release it.  Until you used the term differently (as did the instructor in the video), I had never seen the term "slingshot" and "hand-over" used interchangeably.  I've seen instructors address both methods in classes, and they considered them different techniques.

Hand-over, done properly lets you leave the gun up in front of the face, with the gun kept on or generally pointed toward the target.  If you use the slingshot method as it was originally taught (and as the military taught it until after we sent troops to Afghanistan and Iraq) - you must pinch the rear of the slide and pull it back (just as you pull back the loaded pouch of a slingshot and then release it).   Using THAT technique, you can't easily grasp the slide (in the "slingshot" manner) until you've moved the gun even more out of position.
  • The old argument that slingshoting was a gross motor skill and using the slide stop/release was a fine motor skill has been pretty much debunked:  they're arguably both fine motor skills -- as releasing a slide held in the "slingshot grasp" must also be done cleanly.
  • The handover technique might truly be a gross-motor technique, but it does take longer, and that technique  doesn't always work with the Beretta M9, because large hands can decock the weapon during the rearward stroke.  The handover technique seems to work well with most other guns.
I've always used the off hand after inserting the mag,  to move up to release the slide with several fingers to making a big "claw" that can't miss the slide stop/release, then moving back down to the support position.  That said, I think I like the instructor's technique  of using the offhand thumb as he reposition it to the grip, to release the slide.   I think I'll that technique a try for a while -- as it's a bit simpler than what I've been doing for years.

Hey Walt yea I know what you mean when I said Sling Shot but in a sense even though I'm not pinching the rear of the side with my thumb and finger I'm are still grabbing the slide (with the over hand method) and releasing it like you would a slingshot ! Its a play on words for sure and I should of been more clear in what I meant. :-[ Unfortunately not all CZs are easy to do the slide release/slide lock or whatever we call it LOL especially  my 07,,its kinda flat and close too the frame so with that pistol I use the hand over method. I shoot my 07 90% of the time but do have other CZs with bigger better slide release's and I will use train with different styles of sending the slide home but with that said I'm an old dog and hate to mix things up and get all confused,,LOL I'm not the fastest or the smoothest guy at the range but I am consistent and normally hold my own when I do go to an occasional IDPA/USPSA match. For me its always been about being safe make sure my gun runs 100% and don't finish last and I have always been successful in that, so I'm good. LOL  ;) Yes I agree the Beretta is a awesome gun but it is a different animal for sure,I regret I have only shot one on a couple occasions but always liked it when I did.