Author Topic: Polishing the frame  (Read 914 times)

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Offline briang2ad

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Polishing the frame
« on: December 29, 2018, 02:35:00 PM »
Took my 88 PreB down all the way and did some polishing per the usual - not much improvement.  I usually get better results. 

The frame is crude inside, but I left the frame largely alone (except a few strokes with fine paper) and the rolled up paper in the usual holes very lightly.  Because my frame is SO crude (looks like it was made by the Taliban in a cave), should I try to do the frame inside?  The only way I can see getting to the section where the trigger bar rubs is to use a felt wheel on a Dremel.  Anyone do this?  Thanks. 

Online Ruber

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Polishing the frame
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2018, 02:39:28 PM »
Polishing the inside of the frame, especially along where the trigger and trigger bar ride, did the most for improving my DA pulls.

Even my ?14 75B is very crude inside.  If you don?t have a setup for polishing, BH Springs Solutions has a great starter kit with polishing felts and polishes to go from rough to a mirror polish.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 03:24:47 PM by Ruber »

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2018, 05:19:49 PM »
How did you get to the area where the trigger bar contacts?  With what?  Thanks.

Online Ruber

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Polishing the frame
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2018, 06:13:41 PM »
I started with triangular wood dowels and sand paper (forget the specifics, but fairly fine-medium for metal with mineral oil) to knock down the high spots then went to felt polishing bobs and compounds ( https://bhspringsolutions.com/arcus-98-da/45-deluxe-polishing-kit.html ) with the flex/pencil extension for the Dremel.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2018, 10:30:01 AM by Ruber »

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2018, 07:05:44 PM »
Thanks!

Online Ruber

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2018, 07:13:18 PM »
You?re welcome.

Go slow and clean & dry thoroughly between stages.  Just a little bit makes a huge difference (at least with my guns).

As a footnote, I run factory springs because I tend to shoot my own handloads or use the Kadet kits.  Sooo... if you are already using reduced power springs, ymmv.

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2018, 04:12:42 PM »
I use a 17LB spring in my old Transitional and it does well.  Went to this a while back to ignite the Kadet 22 kit.  So, I switched to this.  I am a bit surptoised that I have felt no real difference from the stock spring in my 'new' 88 preB.  This one felt like it had a BUNCH of potential but it is stubborn.  I carefully polished the parts to include the frame as stated, and it is not smoothing out well. 3/4 of the way back I get some real grit/stacking and I think it is the frame.  I may just dry fire and shoot it a bunch, then go back in.  Removing and replacing the Preb safety can be high adventure. Too many times to the trough could end in a lost detent/spring.  (Although I was able to convert my transitional to a B safety and have a spare assembly for that day). 

Eventually this one will get Cerakote, so I may wait till then.  It needs more rounds to properly break in. 

Offline Earl Keese

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2018, 04:39:01 PM »
Does the trigger feel gritty when the sear cage is out?

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2018, 11:29:31 PM »
Sir: as I recall,no.  However, I didn?t work it enough to remember well.  I did polish the bottom of the sear cage fairly well.  My grit comes close to the end of the pull.  I think there may be a flaw in the frame casting, hence my thread.

Offline Earl Keese

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2018, 07:09:21 AM »
Sir: as I recall,no.  However, I didn?t work it enough to remember well.  I did polish the bottom of the sear cage fairly well.  My grit comes close to the end of the pull.  I think there may be a flaw in the frame casting, hence my thread.
You can work the trigger while the sear cage is out, while pushing down on the trigger bar so it's riding in it's normal position. If the pull is smooth while trying it this way, you may want to look elsewhere for the source of your problem.

Online Ruber

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2018, 10:19:14 AM »
....My grit comes close to the end of the pull. ...
SA or DA? 

Polishing the frame for me did nothing fir the gritty feel at the end of the SA pull, that?s all hammer/sear.

Polishing the frame along with the trigger bar did make the entirety of the DA stroke buttery smooth though

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2018, 11:28:31 AM »
Yes, DA.  Interesting.  Never touched the frame on my Transitional and 84 and they ended up buttery smooth.

I can tell you that the 88 with a 17 LB spring sends a pencil 3 feet into the air.

Online Ruber

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2018, 12:32:02 PM »
Yes, DA.  Interesting.  Never touched the frame on my Transitional and 84 and they ended up buttery smooth.

Still, I?ll bet if you polished the surfaces to a mirror, you?d be amazed.

I have one 75b that I use as a dedicated .22 for bullseye since it had the best trigger of any factory 75b I had tried.

Since there is no fpb in the Kadet kit, I pulled the lifter and fitted a CGW t3 disco and their 85c trigger.  At the final stages of fitting, I polished the frame.

Even though it started off pretty good for a CZ trigger, polishing the frame made a world of difference.  ;)

Offline briang2ad

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2019, 10:32:52 AM »
Thanks for the encouragement.  I will likely proceed next time I detail strip.  My main concern is the method.  I will look for obvious flaws and machine marks, but getting my fat finger into the frame is tough.  A dremel felt wheel seems like it makes sense - especially the larger ones that provide stand off.  Wish there were little sticks with sandpaper pads! 

Most of my grit now is in the final stage of the trigger pull.  I think this is actually the disco. might have to review the smoothing thread to approach this or install a CGW T3.  I do want to hit the place in the center where the disco contacts the frame - I suppose that it does not matter if you take too much off there - correct?  Thanks,

Offline evanrw61

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Re: Polishing the frame
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2019, 09:59:20 AM »
There is great way to get into tight places to polish and deburr, called micro-mesh. It comes in sheets pads, and tongue depressor styled stick's. I've used them for decades and they work great. They are self leveling and won't load up like convention sandpaper does. They come in a variety of grits from the 100 to we'll over 1000 grit. I also found a sanding stick that uses replaceable bands. You just move the belt over the sanding flat when it becomes used. Got mine now at Amazon. Look for ?micro mesh sanding sticks?. I can't recommend the micro mesh products highly enough. I've used their products as toolmaker for the last 20+ years with only the best results. Their products are not cheap, but they do last longer than regular emery cloth.

 

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