Author Topic: A Beginner's Draw Question  (Read 988 times)

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Offline Rdneck

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A Beginner's Draw Question
« on: September 16, 2019, 06:59:41 AM »
I would like to try shooting some competitions one day and I'm in the very early stages of learning to shoot from a holster draw.  I'm using a RHT holster and a Shadow 2.  When practicing draws, I'm having a problem with the pistol not sliding easily from the holster consistently.  At times, it seems to stick when drawing.  I've varied the way I grip the pistol and the draw angle and at times thought I had it figured out but can't consistently get it to work.  This is getting frustrating.  I've loosened the retention a couple of times and when holding the holster in my handle, the pistol slides out freely every time.  There's shavings from the liner in the FCS of the pistol but I'm thinking that's normal for a new holster.  Do I keep adjusting the retention until it's better?  Do I need to do something with my draw motion that I haven't tried? 
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Offline Bossgobbler

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2019, 04:55:10 PM »
The holster on the belt should be straight up an down. Draw slow and dry fire one shot DA over and over for about 5 minutes each day. Make sure you are getting a good grip and the same grip each time. After the 5 minutes of slowly drawing speed up a little. Do you have a timer?

Offline George16

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2019, 11:22:49 PM »
You can also adjust the cant of your holster to match the way you draw. My holster is canted a little bit to the rear since the holster has to be NetInfo the hipbone in accordance with the rules of production and carry optics divisions in USPSA. Start slowly drawing it out and then putting it back in.

Since you plan to compete some dry fire books by Ben Stoeger and Steve Anderson. Ben’s Dry Fire Reloaded and Steve’s Repetitions are great dry fire  books. These books help a lot. I know it helped me when I was starting out.

Online Earl Keese

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2019, 06:25:52 AM »
Rdneck- what kind of belt and hanger are you using with your holster? If the holster isn't firmly mounted, that could be contributing to your problem.

Offline M.Ray

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2019, 11:28:31 AM »
Same here. Need to learn how to draw efficiently
May the force be with you & me.

Offline recoilguy

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2019, 01:35:10 PM »
Earl Keese asks a great question.
Your equipment will matter immensely in your ability to draw smoothly and without hiccups.

Always be sure you use the same equipment same technique and that it is set up the same every time and properly..
If you do not you can not create good muscle memory. Move as little as possible the les you move the smoother the result

The video posted is a good video as well there is a lot of extra info and some things for more then a beginner needs to now but it covers the basics very nicely.


RCG
What I lack in speed , I make up for with inaccuracy

Offline LarryBoy

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2019, 02:31:04 PM »
When I'm given the make ready command, I loosen the retention screws so that there is very little friction on the draw from the holster. Then when I holster after the if finished command I tighten the retention screws back down to secure the gun.

Offline Rdneck

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2019, 10:01:58 PM »
I've probably done 500 hundred draws in the last few days.  I have learned that if I draw the pistol straight up and out of the holster, it slides freely.  Also, the holster needs to be on my hip bone.  If the holster slides back even a little, I have problems.  I had to develop a feel for an easy draw and it takes practice.  I did about 120 one shot draws this afternoon and the pistol easily slid out of the holster on every one.  I'm using a Kore gunbelt and the holster is on a Bladetech hanger.  I'm aware that they both need upgrading.  And I have been using a timer.

Thanks for everyone's response.
I had rather be hated for what I am
than loved for what I'm not.

Online Earl Keese

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2019, 10:13:32 PM »
The sooner you can buy a Boss Hangar the better. There's a cheaper Ebay version that isn't as nicely finished. I'm not a gear snob, but it's a game changer.

Offline recoilguy

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2019, 09:03:22 AM »
Good stuff casts a little extra for a reason.
It is a game changer.

RCG
What I lack in speed , I make up for with inaccuracy

Offline Rdneck

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Re: A Beginner's Draw Question
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2019, 10:43:38 AM »
I have a Boss hanger on order.  Thanks.
I had rather be hated for what I am
than loved for what I'm not.