Author Topic: Larger caliber practice advice  (Read 356 times)

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Offline The Principal

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Larger caliber practice advice
« on: November 27, 2020, 11:04:53 AM »
I am reasonably satisfied with my progression and accuracy shooting my p10c and 75b within self defense ranges. When I step up to my Glock 20 (10 auto) my groupings and consistency weakens (still on center target, but not as tight). I believe I understand the  fundamentals that I need to work on. I haven’t been shooting this gun for very long or very consistently, maybe 1, maybe 2x month at about 50 rounds per trip. I’ve only shot around 350-400 rounds with this gun and ever with 10mm. I am looking for some advice around training/learning with a larger caliber. Am I best just focusing on shooting this gun until I improve, or should I still shoot my 9mm’s to keep progressing with those guns, as well. Will improving with the 10mm carry over to the other guns? I know there are a lot of variables for what I may need to work on, specifically. I am just seeking some general advice on how focused I should be on that one gun. Thank you.


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Offline John A.

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Re: Larger caliber practice advice
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2020, 12:16:17 PM »
There are some guns that I just shoot better than others.  So, my opinion is going to be worth exactly what you paid for it.

I have told many people to try out a bunch of different guns and see which they shoot the best because at the end of the day, if you have to use it as intended, putting rounds on target is a lot more important than what you are launching them with.

FWIW, I don't own a glock.  I have never held a glock that I really even like.  But I will never tell anyone else they should not own one because they may shoot it better than anything else.

Choices are good. 

But I tend to gravitate more towards what works well for me rather than what the crowd is using.   I've sold a lot of guns over the years that just didn't do as well for me as I had hoped.  No regrets over selling or trading any of them. 

There's my humble opinion about it.  I would never keep a gun that I had to change how I shoot in order to compensate for what gun I am holding.  Either it works well for you or it doesn't.  And if it doesn't, it's time to move along to something that does.

When people ignorant of guns make gun laws, you end up with ignorant gun laws.

Offline Joe L

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Re: Larger caliber practice advice
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2020, 01:36:51 PM »
The progression I have is from .22 to 9mm to .45 cal, so not quite to the 10mm, so I can only tell you what I experienced going to the .45.  I was not comfortable shooting it until I had a lot of rounds through it.  But now, it is about my favorite gun.  Now my CZ-97B"E" is probably heavier than your Glock in 10 mm, and that makes it easier to shoot comfortably, but I had a flinch for a while, especially shooting single hand standing under a shed. 

If I had just gotten a large caliber pistol, I think what I would do is shoot it from a rest for a while, maybe at 25 yards or so, until I was confident in my ability to fire the pistol without any hesitation or flinch.  The bench rest takes some of the unknowns out of the picture, and will let you become comfortable releasing a round.  You can also get a better indication of what group sizes are likely to be achieved under steadier conditions than two-handed standing. 

Some dry fire will also help you become comfortable with the pistol size and grip shape and trigger pull. 

If you find that the gun is really good mechanically (accurate) when shooting from a rest, it will make learning to shoot it well standing two handed much more interesting to you.   

Shooting from a rest for accuracy, also slows you down and will help you maximize the benefit you get from each round. 

Perhaps some folks with experience with 10mm and larger will chime in.  I don't want to shoot anything more violent than a lightly loaded .45 myself.  And I've done that today already.

Joe
CZ-75B 9mm and Kadet, 97B"E", two P-09's, P-07, P-10C, P-10F

Offline The Principal

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Re: Larger caliber practice advice
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2020, 01:47:55 PM »
The progression I have is from .22 to 9mm to .45 cal, so not quite to the 10mm, so I can only tell you what I experienced going to the .45.  I was not comfortable shooting it until I had a lot of rounds through it.  But now, it is about my favorite gun.  Now my CZ-97B"E" is probably heavier than your Glock in 10 mm, and that makes it easier to shoot comfortably, but I had a flinch for a while, especially shooting single hand standing under a shed. 

If I had just gotten a large caliber pistol, I think what I would do is shoot it from a rest for a while, maybe at 25 yards or so, until I was confident in my ability to fire the pistol without any hesitation or flinch.  The bench rest takes some of the unknowns out of the picture, and will let you become comfortable releasing a round.  You can also get a better indication of what group sizes are likely to be achieved under steadier conditions than two-handed standing. 

Some dry fire will also help you become comfortable with the pistol size and grip shape and trigger pull. 

If you find that the gun is really good mechanically (accurate) when shooting from a rest, it will make learning to shoot it well standing two handed much more interesting to you.   

Shooting from a rest for accuracy, also slows you down and will help you maximize the benefit you get from each round. 

Perhaps some folks with experience with 10mm and larger will chime in.  I don't want to shoot anything more violent than a lightly loaded .45 myself.  And I've done that today already.

Joe
Joe, Thank you for the advice. Much appreciated!


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Offline M1A4ME

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Re: Larger caliber practice advice
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2020, 04:00:47 PM »
I've only shot 3 Glock pistols in my life.  None keep up with a good CZ.

So, not being able to shoot comparable groups with the Glock might no be all your fault.  Do you go shooting with anyone else?  If so, let them shoot a couple magazines through it and see if the groups are better than yours, or comparable.

I never found my M31 recoil objectionable.  Much more comfortable to shoot than the M&P FS in .357 SIG.  It just wouldn't shoot to suit me.
I stopped carrying the SIG 556R.  SIG changed models and couple/three times and stopped supporting it with parts.  So, I stopped supporting SIG.  Back to the tried/true AR15 Carbine.

Offline skin

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Re: Larger caliber practice advice
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2020, 04:30:47 PM »
 I had a g20, ( sold it and bought a sig hunter 10mm, like steel) with the factory barrel it shot pretty good. Put a lone wolf barrel and it shot a lot better. You have to remember, the  10mm is almost a 41 mag. That being said, you should practice with it as much as possible to get use to the snappy recoil. Once you get use to it, it'll make shooting the 9mm's seem like a 22lr. Btw I have used the g20 to take hogs and song dogs out to 100 yds with 180's and 200gr rounds. I love the 10mm!