Author Topic: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?  (Read 4492 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Beefeater

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« on: October 08, 2021, 08:10:55 AM »
For my USPSA peers, when did you start shooting level 2 and 1 matches?  Am I missing out on anything by sticking to club matches until I am more competitive ...? Class D ranking currently.

Thank you for your insight!
The only thing I like better than a good steak, is two good steaks.

Offline 2morechains

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1113
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2021, 12:06:04 PM »
Level 2 matches (aka Sectional or State matches) will recognize all the classes that have sufficient competitors registered for each division/class.  The rulebook requires at least 5 competitors per division/class in order to be recognized.  For example: you are shooting Prod division and there are at least 5 D-class competitors in the match, in that case the the MD can recognize High D class for that division.  However say there are only 4 C-class in Prod, in that case Prod C-class is not recognized. 

For Level 3 (aka Area match) there must be at least 10 competitors per division/class in order to be recognized. 

Recognition aside, I would shoot the match.  Lots to be learned from attending if you’re just starting out. You’ll probably see things you don’t see at your normal local match (such as level of competition or complex stage designs), plus there is the mental aspect of shooting a “major” match. 

Offline SoCal

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 597
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2021, 01:12:45 PM »
I agree that a level 2 event is educational and (hopefully) fun.  Along with everything else you will most likely learn lots about the rules.  Also sometimes other people on your squad may help with tips and advice so be open to their input.  Everyone there started where you are.

If you do shoot a level look for a squad with more C and B level shooters in your division as opposed to M or GM as you will learn more from people that are closer to your skill level IMHO.  That is not to say taking a class from a world class shooter is not helpful but a competition is different from a class.

Shooting with people in your magazine capacity is also help full as a person shooting Production, single stack, etc. will often shoot a stage different than someone with 20+ rounds.

« Last Edit: October 08, 2021, 01:23:50 PM by SoCal »
If I had known how much better being retired is than working I would have done it FIRST.

Offline IronicTwitch

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 489
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2021, 05:34:28 PM »
If your local is 20-30 shooters with a couple A and maybe M class guys, then seeing how you stack up at a Level 2 can be interesting if real GM's show up.

Stage design at L2 is usually worth it. The crew puts in a lot of work and having dedicated ROs to each stage helps. It should push limits of your shooting ability (long targets, more movement, more options if you want to take risks).

Most Level 2's are more like a marathon full day 10-12 stages vs 4-5 stage local where you're done by lunch.  If you have a drive, it might be worth staying the night before AND after.  I've done a full day match with a 5 hour drive after and it was a long day.

Offline Smitty79

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1288
  • So many guns, so little time
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2021, 10:13:35 AM »
I'm coming from being a B production shooting who greatly reduced my level of participation for a few years.    Now I've just about clawed my way back to B in carry optics.   I'll be a Super Senior in March.    The body doesn't move as fast as it used to.

It kind of depends on where you are in D.   If you are a 20% D, I wouldn't go to an L2.    This shooting is typically harder than club matches.    This isn't universally true.    But is typical.     Some of the difficult partials and swingers I've seen at L2s, would be very rare at club matches.

On the other hand, if you don't mind some shots that you just can't make, go for it.    They are fun and definitely interesting.
Don't mistake my high post count for knowledge or wisdom.   I just like hearing myself type.

Offline Atomic Punk

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 271
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2021, 10:36:20 AM »
I just started USPSA this year and came in as a C. My local match has some great shooters and I feel like I am still drinking from the firehose. There are so many moving parts and I need to get better at the basics. Personally, I don't feel the juice is worth the squeeze of a Level 2 (given the added expense and complexity) until I am at B...or at least knocking on the door. Your situation could be very different. 

Offline tdogg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2653
  • Two Alpha!
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2021, 07:07:07 PM »
I don't know, I did my first level 2 match and signed up on a super squad (Nils, Charlie Perez, Leighton, etc...).  I was a waitlist and that was one of two squads open when they approved me to shoot.  At the time I didn't know who those guys were I just knew they were GM's.  It was awesome to watch good shooters and I learned a ton on how to approach stage planning and execution.  I had more mikes than normal as I tried to do what I saw them do and failed miserably.  I didn't care, I was having fun and learning. 

I agree that you will see complex stages that challenge your mental prep.  There should be more advanced stage props that are challenging and fun to tackle.  You have to assess whether you are mentally/physically able to tackle more advanced courses of fire.

If you don't have the gun handling skills (drawing, reloading, footwork movements in all directions, etc...) to safely navigate any course of fire (read complete newbie), then I'd pass until you are completely confident in your ability to handle your gun safely.  If you are the guy folks have to remind to keep you trigger out of the guard or are at risk of sweeping yourself anytime you reholster, then I'd probably wait till you can do them unconsciously.  There is no sense paying the higher cost of entry of a level 2 and risk getting a DQ right off the bat.

Otherwise if you have the means and are interested there should be nothing stopping you from giving it a shot.  You will learn a lot and hopefully have fun doing it, so why not?

Cheers,
Toby
This forum rocks!

Offline Wideload

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 346
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2021, 09:28:04 PM »
If the level 2 is kind of local ( does not require more than one overnight stay at a hotel and less than 4-5 hours driving distance) I'd say go sign up.
As already suggested, squad with shooters with mag capacity similar to what you shoot.  Also squad with better shooters.

Take enough ammo for 1.5 x - 2x the published round count in case you have to reshoot a stage or two.

Get to the destination early so that on the evening before the match, walk through all the stages so you can "sleep on it".

On the day of the match, eat a decent breakfast,  keep hydrated, have snacks, avoid heavy lunch and enjoy the day.
A-1 Dinsintegrating Pistol
Illudium Q36 Explosive Space Modulator

Offline KineticAp1

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 33
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2021, 06:21:53 PM »
I don't know, I did my first level 2 match and signed up on a super squad (Nils, Charlie Perez, Leighton, etc...).  I was a waitlist and that was one of two squads open when they approved me to shoot.  At the time I didn't know who those guys were I just knew they were GM's.  It was awesome to watch good shooters and I learned a ton on how to approach stage planning and execution.  I had more mikes than normal as I tried to do what I saw them do and failed miserably.  I didn't care, I was having fun and learning. 

I agree that you will see complex stages that challenge your mental prep.  There should be more advanced stage props that are challenging and fun to tackle.  You have to assess whether you are mentally/physically able to tackle more advanced courses of fire.

If you don't have the gun handling skills (drawing, reloading, footwork movements in all directions, etc...) to safely navigate any course of fire (read complete newbie), then I'd pass until you are completely confident in your ability to handle your gun safely.  If you are the guy folks have to remind to keep you trigger out of the guard or are at risk of sweeping yourself anytime you reholster, then I'd probably wait till you can do them unconsciously.  There is no sense paying the higher cost of entry of a level 2 and risk getting a DQ right off the bat.

Otherwise if you have the means and are interested there should be nothing stopping you from giving it a shot.  You will learn a lot and hopefully have fun doing it, so why not?

Cheers,
Toby

This is great advice.... m local to Nols and Leighton and even shooting a club match with them you can learn... but at a higher level match, as long as you are safe...your eyes will be opened. The complexity of stage design and more shooters of a higher caliber ( ha I made a pun)  will allow you to see some areas where you can work.

Im not a fan of using a Classifier as the sole means shooting level, but rather your overall skill level. I run Open Minor and its definitely a detriment to your scores, but I can usually do fairly decent time wise...not nils level but decent lol.... For the record I was. B limited shooter and C open/carry optic.

Practice is a huge part of it as well....I remember Leighton telling me he shoots like 10k rounds a month( I could be a little high, but this was 6-7 years ago). Im lucky these days if I shoot 1000 a month at this point

 

Offline Johnny Chimpo

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 48
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2021, 08:52:16 AM »
For my USPSA peers, when did you start shooting level 2 and 1 matches?  Am I missing out on anything by sticking to club matches until I am more competitive ...? Class D ranking currently.

Thank you for your insight!
Club matches are level 1 (the lowest)

State and section championships are level 2

Area matches and Nationals are level 3

You're definitely missing out by avoiding level 2s until you're "more competitive".  Let's say you do wait until you're more competitive in local matches.  Your level of success there might or might not translate to a higher level match.  It all depends on how good you really are, how much heat in your division exists locally, how good are the stage designs in your local matches, and on who decides to show up at a level 2 match when you go.

Go to a level 2 match as soon as you have a solid feel for the game.  To me that means that you're a competent gun handler, you can complete most local matches without mikes, no shoots, and other procedurals, and have a solid grasp of what equipment is legal in your division.  I've seen more than a few people at level 1 matches with gear issues that would get them at least a trip to the safety area and maybe a bump to open at a level 2 match, where they DO check everything.

You will learn a lot about you, your game, and your gear by doing so.

I'm in my third season in USPSA (production the first year and CO after that) and this is the first season I went to four level 2 and one level 3 (Area 5) matches.  I had a blast and learned a ton even when I got DQd from two of them.

Offline scroadkill

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2022, 05:46:07 PM »
a local 10 stage sectional isn't much more than a really good club match but I'm not sure I would bother as a mid D class shooter... and it might hurt the ego beyond repair.  On the other hand IMO as you approach B class level 2s are a good idea for the learning experience and fun factor.. and the added challenge helps keep the game fresh. 

Offline MetalGravy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 383
Re: USPSA Peers, When should I shoot a level 2 match?
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2022, 05:50:07 PM »
I shot my first level 2 (local sectional) about 7 months after starting USPSA and did terribly.  To be fair, I had low expectations going in and was just doing it for the experience.  Because I joined USPSA that week, none of the classifiers I had shot up to that point counted so I was actually unclassified.  I got bumped from Production to Open (box violation) and finished dead last overall.  The match sealed my decision to take competition more seriously.  That was 2016, and I am still in the sport, though, not getting out as much as I would like.

Keep your expectations realistic and your ego should come out fine.