Author Topic: Striker Fire for CC  (Read 3399 times)

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Online lewmed

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2020, 12:28:17 PM »
   I'm old-school when I use a IWB holster for a small striker fired pistol I remove the holster, insert the pistol and then place the holster back in my waistband.

Offline seebee62

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2020, 01:22:41 PM »
The way I do it everyday.

I put my IWB Holster and gun(which is a Vedder Light Tuck) in my waistband. When I come home it’s the opposite holster and gun come out together.

If I were to carry my CZ P07 I do the same.

Even when I put a gun in the holster I check the that there’s no obstructions in the holster and point everything in a safe direction as I put the gun in.



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Offline Atomic Punk

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2020, 09:28:21 PM »
Tau Dev Group makes the Striker Control Device aka Glock Gadget. It replaces the Glock's rear slide cover plate and tilts outward when you press the trigger. If you apply pressure to the back of the slide, it blocks rearward motion of the striker and the trigger like a hammer on a double action gun. If you thumb the back of the slide when you’re reholstering, the gun can’t fire.

Not sure if they make them for any other striker fired guns but it seems like a great idea.

Offline CzechnoWizard

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2020, 09:36:31 PM »
Doing my best to be concise and not open an eternal debate:  I love my decocker cz's for range and competition. Love my 1911s for the same purposes. However I carry glocks, and practice alot with them for self defense purposes.  While i can train most anyone to operate most any weapon system, Glock is my default suggestion to any newcomer as the manual of arms is as simple as it gets.

One thing I would offer: if you are worried about AD while holstering, recall that striker guns usually have a trigger face safety, whereas DA guns do not.  Also remember that holstering is almost never something you must do in a hurry, while drawing and shooting almost always will need to be fast, instinctive,  and intuitive. 

Lastly, in evaluating striker designs, understand there are several systems on the market. GLOCK is somewhat unique in being a true DAO design. The striker is not "cocked" until the trigger is compressed. There is no stored energy in the striker spring waiting to "go off"  if dropped etc. Others, springfield for example,  are partial precock designs aimed at improving trigger pull.  These systems are closer to a SAO trigger, albeit with heavier pull.   All have multiple safeties built in such as a striker block, trigger blade safety, etc but I regard the glock design as being inherently safer than those which involve keeping the striker partially cocked between shots. If you want to fear something I think you should fear forgetting to decock before holstering, forgetting to apply the safety if employing cocked and locked carry, forgetting to flick a safety off during the draw,  or failing to master the da/sa transition in a high stress situation. I see no reason to be uncomfortable with strikers even if we all know how much sweeter a da/sa hammer gun can be!

Offline BStill

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2020, 10:11:00 PM »
just curious if, in theory,  you can work on a Glock trigger, or any striker, in order to increase the pull weight?  What is so special about a 5 pound trigger pull?  why not 8-9 pounds?

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Offline jurek

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2020, 11:01:57 PM »
just curious if, in theory,  you can work on a Glock trigger, or any striker, in order to increase the pull weight?  What is so special about a 5 pound trigger pull?  why not 8-9 pounds?
I'm not sure if 5 is the magic number, but 4 - 5 pounds trigger pull makes all shots accurate (you don't need to fight with trigger, just pull and bum). 4 - 5 is still safe using proper holster and following all safety rules.

Offline BStill

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2020, 06:24:59 AM »
just curious if, in theory,  you can work on a Glock trigger, or any striker, in order to increase the pull weight?  What is so special about a 5 pound trigger pull?  why not 8-9 pounds?
I'm not sure if 5 is the magic number, but 4 - 5 pounds trigger pull makes all shots accurate (you don't need to fight with trigger, just pull and bum). 4 - 5 is still safe using proper holster and following all safety rules.
agree... but hypothetically.... "what if" someone had become familiar and comfortable with a heavier trigger pull because maybe they've carried a tuned up DAO snubbie revolver for a long time, but also likes the form factor of a Glock for ease of carry and shooting ergos.  Just asking if it's technically/mechanically possible to increase the weight at which the Glock trigger breaks?  or even increase the weight of the take-up to simulate a length of pull before the break?

thx

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Offline jurek

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2020, 08:45:48 AM »
agree... but hypothetically.... "what if" someone had become familiar and comfortable with a heavier trigger pull because maybe they've carried a tuned up DAO snubbie revolver for a long time, but also likes the form factor of a Glock for ease of carry and shooting ergos.  Just asking if it's technically/mechanically possible to increase the weight at which the Glock trigger breaks?  or even increase the weight of the take-up to simulate a length of pull before the break?

thx
If somebody is ok with heavy pull - that shouldn't be a problem. All is about accuracy of the shot. But why do this? It would be like disabling power steering in your car  :-\
Actually I've got a good experience with this recently. I've shot few rental firearms with my friend and noticed each one has different trigger pull weight. It was probably my habit / preference - but definitely I was more comfortable and more accurate with pistol with lighter trigger pull (VP9) than the heavier one (SIG365). From security perspective - both pistols are the same.

Increasing Glock's trigger pull??? I have no idea. I don't shoot Glocks. I will probably leave Glock outside and wait until it get rusty to make its trigger heavier...  :P ;)

Offline crosstimbers

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2020, 01:25:23 PM »
I too prefer a hammer-fired pistol. If you don't mind .380, the Colt Govt 380 is a good choice. You will have to search gun shows for one though. I carry mine with an empty chamber, not everyone likes that form of carry, so you have to consider that as well.

Offline Atomic Punk

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2020, 05:13:14 PM »
just curious if, in theory,  you can work on a Glock trigger, or any striker, in order to increase the pull weight?  What is so special about a 5 pound trigger pull?  why not 8-9 pounds?

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NYPD Glocks have a 12lb!  :o trigger pull so it can certainly be done.

Offline CzechnoWizard

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2020, 09:32:45 PM »
just curious if, in theory,  you can work on a Glock trigger, or any striker, in order to increase the pull weight?  What is so special about a 5 pound trigger pull?  why not 8-9 pounds?

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NYPD Glocks have a 12lb!  :o trigger pull so it can certainly be done.
Yes. Exactly, in fact the parts needed are referred to as a ny1 or ny2 trigger. I see no benefit in wrecking an otherwise reasonable and responsible trigger weight, but it certainly can be done.

Offline Rotorflyr66

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2020, 02:13:04 PM »
My take on the "fear" aspect is that people hear (or more likely read about on forums) the "Glock leg" stories (often) and think it's happening all the time and that strikers will go off at a feathers touch.....Key, as was mentioned previously, is to take your time during re-holstering and make sure nothing is in the way....Or as pointed out, get a pistol with a thumb safety (like the Shield) and practice re-holstering by putting the safety on before sliding it back into the holster...If you want AFTER it's holstered, you can always flick the safety off....just Be Consistent In What You Do And How You Do It while practicing.
 
If you're in a situation where you "have to" re-holster quickly, such as the cops screeching to a halt a few ft away, just drop (or place) the gun on the ground in front of you and worry about the potential scratches to it's finish later....I know some people envision the bad guy sticking around to shoot them when they do but, more then likely, in reality they aren't going to be sticking around as those cop cars are screeching to a halt because they 1) They don't want to get arrested and C) They don't want to get shot...by multiple cops.

Just carry what you shoot best, can conceal well and carry comfortably, if that's a 3lb 12oz Desert Eagle, go for it....If it's a 25oz Glock 48, great, If it's an 8oz KelTec P3AT, then do that....

Offline ohiodff

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2020, 03:57:47 PM »
Late to the party but I have a specific take.  I too prefer the consistency of a striker-fire/DAO trigger that is always the same pull every time.  For a long time I went with a DAO hammer fire because I like the tactile safety of thumb on hammer as you holster/re-holster.  But then I found my holy grail - Walther PPS.  And for all the reasons I love it, the most comforting for me was that as the trigger is pulled there is a little pin that will emerge from the back of the slide - quite similar to how a hammer works, and gives the same feeling that "uh oh, something is moving" were there ever to be an instance of the trigger catching on something.

I also went to a kydex holster only.  I used to (and still do) love the Aliengear that I have, but my work is a CPZ so having to disarm/rearm 1-2 times every day brings in a lot of risk with that holster.  Going with kydex made it so much nicer to just remove the holster with gun and putting it back on is a breeze as well - no trigger exposure at all.  I'm 100% kydex now which is too bad, because the Aliengear is such a comfortable ride.

CZ needs to make a single stack 9mm!
CZ PCR - CGW
CZ P-07
CZ 85 Combat
CZ P-06
CZ 97B
Colt King Cobra 6" .357 magnum
A bunch of inferior pistols

Offline Firemanjones

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2020, 09:20:05 AM »
Call me old fashion, but is it DA/SA for me when carrying.
The striker fire pistol I have and carry is a Walther P99 which is DA/SA.
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Living the dream, driving a Fire Engine RETIRED shooting my Guns in FL and the Mountains of NC and visiting family in Mannheim.

Offline BStill

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Re: Striker Fire for CC
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2020, 09:28:16 AM »
Call me old fashion, but is it DA/SA for me when carrying.
The striker fire pistol I have and carry is a Walther P99 which is DA/SA.
I handled a P99cAS a couple years ago.  Great design.  Hard to find.

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